Dr. Sher Blog

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“Functional” Ovarian Cysts and IVF

by Dr. Geoffrey Sher on April 19, 2016

An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. An ovarian follicle that is larger than 22mm is termed a functional follicular cyst. They are non-malignant (benign) and harmless and in most cases, don’t even cause symptoms, however, in some cases, rapid distention of the cyst, or a rupture with bleeding, can lead to sudden and severe pain and in some cases, a disruption in hormone balance leads to vaginal bleeding.

There are 2 varieties of “functional” ovarian cysts:

  1. Follicle Cysts: In menstruating women, a follicle containing the unfertilized egg will rupture during ovulation. If this does not occur, a follicular cyst of more than 2.5 cm diameter may result. These cysts develop in response to stimulation with follicle stimulating hormone that is either self-produced (by the woman’s own pituitary gland (endogenous) or is induced by agonists (e.g. Lupron/Decapeptyl/Buserelin) that sometimes propagate increased and sustained pituitary FSH release.
  2. Corpus luteum cysts: These appear after ovulation or egg retrieval. The corpus luteum is the remnant of the follicle after the ovum has moved to the fallopian tubes. It usually degrades within 5-9 days. A corpus luteum of > 3 cm is regarded as being cystic.

Follicular cysts: These lesions have special relevance to women about to undergo controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) with gonadotropins for IVF where they can literally, “throw a spanner in the works”, causing a delay, postponement and sometimes even cancellation of the cycle of treatment.

Functional Ovarian cysts must be distinguished from “non-functional or cystic ovarian tumors.” By definition, “tumors that are capable of independent growth.” Thus “cystic ovarian tumors do not develop as a result of exposure to gonadotropin stimulation and it is this feature that distinguishes them from “functional” ovarian cysts.

Aside from sometimes causing pain and dysfunctional uterine bleeding, unruptured follicular cysts are usually relatively non-problematic. As stated above, in some cases, functional “cysts” undergo rapid distention (often as a result of a minor degree of bleeding inside the cyst itself). In such cases the woman will often experience a sharp or aching pain on one or other side of her lower abdomen and/or deep seated pain during intercourse. The cysts may even rupture, causing sudden lower abdominal pain that exacerbates and may even simulate an attack of acute appendicitis or a ruptured ectopic (tubular) pregnancy. While very unpleasant, a ruptured “functional cyst” seldom produces a degree of internal bleeding that warrants surgical intervention. The pain, typically is made worse by movement. It stabilizes within a number of days but subsides progressively to disappear within about four to seven days.

Whenever an ovarian cyst is detected (usually by ultrasound examination), the first consideration should be to determine whether it is a “functional cyst or a “cystic ovarian tumor”. The reason for this is that tumors are subject to a variety of complications such as twisting (torsion), hemorrhage, infection and even malignant change, all of which usually will require surgical intervention.

Gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) such as Lupron, Buserelin, Nafarelin and Synarel, administered daily, starting a few days prior to menstruation, all elicit an initial and rapid, out-pouring (“surge”) in pituitary LH and FSH release. This “surge” lasts for a day or two. Then as the pituitary reservoir of FSH and LH becomes depleted, the blood FSH and LH levels fall rapidly reaching near undetectable blood levels within a day or two. At the same time, the declining FSH result in a drop in blood E2 concentration leading to a withdrawal bleed (menstruation). The progressive exhaustion of Pituitary FSH/LH along with the decline in blood E2, is referred to as ” down-regulation” The continued daily administration of GnRHa or its replacement (supplanting)  with a GnRH antagonist (e.g. Ganirelix, Cetrotide or Orgalutron) results in blood LH concentrations being sustained at a very low level throughout the ensuing cycle of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with gonadotropins, thereby optimizing follicular maturation and promoting E2 induced endometrial proliferation.

Functional follicular cysts resulting from controlled ovarian stimulation (COS), can occur regardless of whether down regulation with GnRHa (Lupron/Buserelin/Decapeptyl) is initiated in cases where the cycle of stimulation is launched with the woman coming off  a BCP or when the agonist is initiated on day 20-23  (the mid luteal phase) of a natural cycle. When this happens it is due to the initial agonist-induced FSH “surge” sometimes so accelerating follicular growth that it leads to the development of one or more “functional follicular cysts”. These cysts release E2 and cause the blood E2 often to remain elevated (>70pg/ml). Depending on the extent of this effect, it sometimes leads to a delay in the onset of menstruation and thus also to deferment in the initiation of COS.

Failure of menstruation to commence within 4-7 days of initiating treatment with GnRHa suggestive of an underlying “functional ovarian cyst” and calls for an ultrasound examination to make the diagnosis. Once diagnosed, depending upon the number and size of cysts detected. There are two therapeutic options:

  1. Wait for the cyst to absorb spontaneously and for menstruation to ensue: While it at first might seem that this approach of continuing  GnRHa therapy in order to cause absorption of the cyst(s) within a week or two might be a good approach , it often has unintended consequences. First there is the real possibility that prolonged uninterrupted GnRHa therapy might blunt subsequent ovarian follicular response to gonadotropin therapy and second, if menstruation does not follow within 10-14 days, the cycle will usually need to be cancelled.
  2. Immediate needle aspiration of the cyst(s) under local anesthesia. I personally favor needle aspiration, sooner rather than later in such cases. Menstruation will usually follow a successful aspiration within 2-4 days. Upon menstruation a blood E2 level is measured and as soon as it drops below 70pg/ml COS can be initiated.
  1. Corpus Luteum cysts: As with follicular cysts, so at times do Corpus Luteum cysts also bleed, distend and cause fain. They often delay onset of spontaneous menstruation by a week or longer (Halban syndrome”.). In isolated cases, internal bleeding within the cyst substance causes pain, rapid enlargement of the lesion and by ultrasound examination reveals local areas of absorption causing it to appear as a “complex” cystic lesion that simulates a tumor, prompting surgical intervention.  Sadly, there are countless cases where women have had an entire ovary removed due to this happening.

“Functional ovarian cysts” rarely present as a serious health hazard. In the vast majority of cases they spontaneously resolve within 2-4 weeks while “cystic tumors” will not. Accordingly, the persistence of any ovarian cyst that persists for longer than 4 weeks should raise suspicion of it being a tumor rather than with a “functional cyst.” Since ovarian tumors can be (or become) malignant, all ovarian cysts that persist for longer than 6 weeks (whether occurring in non-pregnant or pregnant women), should be considered for surgical removal and this should be followed by pathological analysis.

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  • Liz - October 5, 2018 reply

    Hello,

    I have a question about functional cysts. I did stimulation two months ago, froze the eggs while I got the donor sperm shipped to my clinic, rested last month and am scheduled to do a fresh transfer this month. I went in for an ultrasound today on the third day of my period and they found a 4 cm cyst on my right ovary. I’m supposed to go back for another ultrasound in a few days to see if it’s changed, but my dr. says we will still do the transfer as planned. However, I’ve heard of other people getting their cycles cancelled due to a cyst this size. I’m worried that if I do the transfer, the cyst will interfere with implantation. Is this worry unfounded or valid?

    Thank you for your help,

    Liz

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - October 5, 2018 reply

    An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. An ovarian follicle that is larger than 22mm is termed a functional follicular cyst. They are non-malignant (benign) and harmless and in most cases, don’t even cause symptoms, however, in some cases, rapid distention of the cyst , or rupture with bleeding , can lead to sudden and severe pain and in some cases, a disruption in hormone balance leads to vaginal bleeding.

    There are 2 varieties of “functional ovarian cysts:
    1. Follicle Cysts: In menstruating women, a follicle containing the unfertilized egg will rupture during ovulation. If this does not occur, a follicular cyst of more than 2.5 cm diameter may result. These cysts develop in response to stimulation with follicle stimulating hormone that is either self-produced (by the woman’s own pituitary gland (endogenous) or is induced by agonists (e.g. Lupron/Decapeptyl/Buserelin) that sometimes propagate increased and sustained pituitary FSH release.
    2. Corpus luteum cysts: These appear after ovulation or egg retrieval. The corpus luteum is the remnant of the follicle after the ovum has moved to the fallopian tubes. It usually degrades within 5-9 days. A corpus luteum of > 3 cm is regarded as being cystic.

    A:Follicular cysts: These lesions have special relevance in women about to undergo controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) with gonadotropins for IVF where they can literally, “throw a spanner in the works”, causing a delay, postponement and sometimes even cancellation of the cycle of treatment.

    Functional Ovarian cysts must be distinguished from “non-functional or cystic ovarian tumors”. By definition, “tumors are capable of independent growth. Thus “cystic ovarian tumors do not develop as a result of exposure to gonadotropin stimulation and it is this feature that distinguishes them from “functional” ovarian cysts.

    Aside from sometimes causing pain and dysfunctional uterine bleeding, unruptured follicular cysts are usually relatively non-problematic. As stated above, in some cases, functional “cysts” undergo rapid distention (often as a result of a minor degree of bleeding inside the cyst itself). In such cases the woman will often experience a sharp or aching pain on one or other side of her lower abdomen and/or deep seated pain during intercourse. The cysts may even rupture, causing sudden lower abdominal pain that exacerbates and may even simulate an attack of acute appendicitis or a ruptured ectopic (tubular) pregnancy. While very unpleasant, a ruptured “functional cyst” seldom produces a degree of internal bleeding that warrants surgical intervention. The pain, typically is made worse by movement. It stabilizes within a number of days but subsides progressively to disappear within about four to seven days.

    Whenever an ovarian cyst is detected (usually by ultrasound examination), the first consideration should be to determine whether it is a “functional cyst or a “cystic ovarian tumor”. The reason for this is that tumors are subject to a variety of complications such as twisting (torsion), hemorrhage, infection and even malignant change, all of which usually will require surgical intervention.

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) such as Lupron, Buserelin, Nafarelin and Synarel, administered daily, starting a few days prior to menstruation, all elicit an initial and rapid, out-pouring (“surge”) in pituitary LH and FSH release. This “surge” lasts for a day or two. Then as the pituitary reservoir of FSH and LH becomes depleted, the blood FSH and LH levels fall rapidly reaching near undetectable blood levels within a day or two. At the same time, the declining FSH result in a drop in blood E2 concentration leading to a withdrawal bleed (menstruation). The progressive exhaustion of Pituitary FSH/LH along with the decline in blood E2, is referred to as ” down-regulation” The continued daily administration of GnRHa or its replacement (supplanting) with a GnRH antagonist (e.g. Ganirelix, Cetrotide or Orgalutron) results in blood LH concentrations being sustained at a very low level throughout the ensuing cycle of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with gonadotropins, thereby optimizing follicular maturation and promoting E2 induced endometrial proliferation.

    Functional follicular cysts resulting from controlled ovarian stimulation (COS), can occur regardless of whether down regulation with GnRHa (Lupron/Buserelin/Decapeptyl) is initiated in cases where the cycle of stimulation is launched with the woman coming off a BCP or when the agonist is initiated on day 20-23 (the mid luteal phase) of a natural cycle. When this happens it is due to the initial agonist-induced FSH “surge” sometimes so accelerating follicular growth that it leads to the development of one or more “functional follicular cysts”. These cysts release E2 and cause the blood E2 often to remain elevated (>70pg/ml). Depending on the extent of this effect, it sometimes leads to a delay in the onset of menstruation and thus also to deferment in the initiation of COS.

    Failure of menstruation to commence within 4-7 days of initiating treatment with GnRHa suggestive of an underlying “functional ovarian cyst” and calls for an ultrasound examination to make the diagnosis. Once diagnosed, depending upon the number and size of cysts detected. There are two therapeutic options:
    1) Wait for the cyst to absorb spontaneously and for menstruation to ensue: While it at first might seem that this approach of continuing GnRHa therapy in order to cause absorption of the cyst(s) within a week or two might be a good approach , it often has unintended consequences. First there is the real possibility that prolonged uninterrupted GnRHa therapy might blunt subsequent ovarian follicular response to gonadotropin therapy and second, if menstruation does not follow within 10-14 days, the cycle will usually need to be cancelled.
    2) Immediate needle aspiration of the cyst(s) under local anesthesia. I personally favor needle aspiration, sooner rather than later in such cases. Menstruation will usually follow a successful aspiration within 2-4 days. Upon menstruation a blood E2 level is measured and as soon as it drops below 70pg/ml COS can be initiated.

    B. Corpus Luteum cysts: As with follicular cysts, so at times do Corpus Luteum cysts also bleed, distend and cause fain. They often delay onset of spontaneous menstruation by a week or longer (Halban syndrome”.). In isolated cases, internal bleeding within the cyst substance causes pain, rapid enlargement of the lesion and by ultrasound examination reveals local areas of absorption causing it to appear as a “complex” cystic lesion that simulates a tumor, prompting surgical intervention. Sadly, there are countless cases where women have had an entire ovary removed due to this happening.

    “Functional ovarian cysts” rarely present as a serious health hazard. In the vast majority of cases they spontaneously resolve within 2-4 weeks while “cystic tumors” will not. Accordingly, the persistence of any ovarian cyst that persists for longer than 4 weeks should raise suspicion of it being a tumor rather than with a “functional cyst”. Since ovarian tumors can be (or become) malignant, all ovarian cysts that persist for longer than 6 weeks (whether occurring in non-pregnant or pregnant women), should be considered for surgical removal and this should be followed by pathological analysis.

    Geoff Sher
    800-780-7437

  • Jovanna - August 27, 2018 reply

    Hello! So my story is that I was on birth control for approximately 10 years. I am now 28 years old and after quitting the pill since June we started tries for a baby. During my first cycle after quitting the pill (28 days cycle ) I had a period of 3 days. Then during my second cycle (29 days) I had my period which was better in terms of days ; 5 days instead of 3. After that and during my 3rd ongoing cycle (currently on day 35) I am almost one week delayed with two negative tests so far, one in 11dpo and one in 17 dpo. I think I had ovulation on the 15th of the cycle.From day 20 to 23 of cycle I had pain in left ovary from which I have ovulated. I contacted my dr and I went for a visit on 17dpo. Peritoneal fluid in left ovary made my dr suspect that I had a corpus luteum cyst that ruptured on the 23rd day and caused my pain. Now I am on the 35th day of cycle and still no period.

    Any clues? How many days can my period be late due to this cyst?

    Thank you in advance
    Jovanna

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - August 27, 2018 reply

    I agree with your doctor. However, I would again repeat the pregnancy test…just in case!

    Geoff Sher

  • Sarah - August 8, 2018 reply

    Hi, not sure if you would have any advice for me. I’m from Australia, 38 year old single women doing ivf. My amh was 8 (Aus measurements) last time checked which I was told was a bit low for my age. I’ve done 2 egg freezing rounds which didn’t yield many. 3 mature ones first time, waiting to here how many out of 6 retrieved second time are mature and can be frozen. Doc has tried two different lots of meds with me and my body just doesn’t seem to respond much. They found a cyst during this round which could what inhibited many growing.
    I’m moving on to doing embryos with donor sperm next round but what I’m wondering is do you think my bodys lack of response is reason to worry? I wanted to bank embryos to get a supply now before too late and also wanting pgs testing but over here they keep telling me embryo banking isn’t allowed except for oncology reasons. Seems silly cos I’m not getting any younger and my response probably won’t get any better.

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - August 8, 2018 reply

    You clearly have diminished ovarian reserve (DOR)and in my opinion, this in my opinion, warrants a review and possible revision of your protocol for ovarian stimulation.

    Women who (regardless of age) have diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) have a reduced potential for IVF success. Much of this is due to the fact that such women tend to have increased production of LH biological activity which can result in excessive LH-induced ovarian male hormone (predominantly testosterone) production which in turn can have a deleterious effect on egg/embryo “competency”.
    While it is presently not possible by any means, to reverse the effect of DOR, certain ovarian stimulation regimes, by promoting excessive LH production (e.g. short agonist/Lupron- “flare” protocols, clomiphene and Letrozole), can in my opinion, make matters worse. Similarly, the amount/dosage of certain fertility drugs that contain LH/hCG (e.g. Menopur) can have a negative effect on the development of the eggs of older women and those who have DOR and should be limited.
    I try to avoid using such protocols/regimes (especially) in women with DOR, favoring instead the use of the agonist/antagonist conversion protocol (A/ACP), a modified, long pituitary down-regulation regime, augmented by adding supplementary human growth hormone (HGH). I further recommend that such women be offered access to embryo banking of PGS (next generation gene sequencing/NGS)-selected normal blastocysts, the subsequent selective transfer of which by allowing them to capitalize on whatever residual ovarian reserve and egg quality might still exist and thereby “make hay while the sun still shines” could significantly enhance the opportunity to achieve a viable pregnancy
    Please visit my new Blog on this very site, http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com, find the “search bar” and type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Ovarian Stimulation for IVF using GnRH Antagonists: Comparing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol.(A/ACP) With the “Conventional” Antagonist Approach
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • The “Biological Clock” and how it should Influence the Selection and Design of Ovarian Stimulation Protocols for IVF.
    • A Rational Basis for selecting Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) protocols in women with Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR)
    • Diagnosing and Treating Infertility due to Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR)
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in Older women and Women who have Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR): A Rational Basis for Selecting a Stimulation Protocol
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Blastocyst Embryo Transfers Should be the Standard of Care in IVF
    • Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET) versus “Fresh” ET: How to Make the Decision
    • Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET): A Rational Approach to Hormonal Preparation and How new Methodology is Impacting IVF.
    • Staggered IVF: An Excellent Option When. Advancing Age and Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR) Reduces IVF Success Rate
    • Embryo Banking/Stockpiling: Slows the “Biological Clock” and offers a Selective Alternative to IVF-Egg Donation.
    • Preimplantation Genetic Testing (PGS) in IVF: It Should be Used Selectively and NOT be Routine.
    • Preimplantation Genetic Sampling (PGS) Using: Next Generation Gene Sequencing (NGS): Method of Choice.
    • PGS in IVF: Are Some Chromosomally Abnormal Embryos Capable of Resulting in Normal Babies and Being Wrongly Discarded?
    • PGS and Assessment of Egg/Embryo “competency”: How Method, Timing and Methodology Could Affect Reliability
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas:
    • Traveling for IVF from Out of State/Country–
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • How Many Embryos should be transferred: A Critical Decision in IVF.
    • The Role of Nutritional Supplements in Preparing for IVF
    • Premature Luteinization (“the premature LH surge): Why it happens and how it can be prevented.
    • IVF Egg Donation: A Comprehensive Overview
    I invite you to arrange to have a Skype or an in-person consultation with me to discuss your case in detail. If you are interested, please contact Julie Dahan, at:

    Email: Julied@sherivf.com

    OR

    Phone: 702-533-2691
    800-780-7437

    I also suggest that you access the 4th edition of my book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies”. It is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

  • Kristin D - July 19, 2018 reply

    I have been trying to conceive for three years, 34yo. I have tried five IUI’s one which resulted in a miscarriage. I started one round of IVF and had only one follicle so the cycle was canceled. I tried to do another round of IVF and had five large cysts so they skipped this cycle. Is there anything I can do to make the cysts go away or prevent them. They initially said I had PCOS but am not overweight and do not have any symptoms, my period is regular. I have not had tiny multiple cysts since my miscarriage they are now larger non-estrogen producing cysts. I do not care for the doctor I see because I feel they do not give personalized care and do the same protocol for each patient. Any advice would be appreciated to aid with the cysts. Thank you!

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - July 19, 2018 reply

    You clearly have diminished ovarian reserve which makes PCOS highly unlikely . In my opinion, against the backdrop of age and diminished ovarian reserve (DOR), the protocol used for ovarian stimulation is one of the most important drivers of egg “competence” (quality) and the number, yielded.
    Women who (regardless of age) have DOR have a reduced potential for IVF success. Much of this is due to the fact that such women tend to have increased production of LH biological activity which can result in excessive LH-induced ovarian male hormone (predominantly testosterone) production which in turn can have a deleterious effect on egg/embryo “competency”.

    While it is presently not possible by any means, to reverse the effect of DOR, certain ovarian stimulation regimes, by promoting excessive LH production (e.g. short agonist/Lupron- “flare” protocols, clomiphene and Letrozole), can in my opinion, make matters worse. Similarly, the amount/dosage of certain fertility drugs that contain LH/hCG (e.g. Menopur) can have a negative effect on the development of the eggs of older women and those who have DOR and should be limited.I try to avoid using such protocols/regimes (especially) in women with DOR, favoring instead the use of the agonist/antagonist conversion protocol (A/ACP), a modified, long pituitary down-regulation regime, augmented by adding supplementary human growth hormone (HGH). I further recommend that such women be offered access to embryo banking of PGS (next generation gene sequencing/NGS)-selected normal blastocysts, the subsequent selective transfer of which by allowing them to capitalize on whatever residual ovarian reserve and egg quality might still exist and thereby “make hay while the sun still shines” could significantly enhance the opportunity to achieve a viable pregnancy

    Please visit my new Blog on this very site, http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com, find the “search bar” and type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.

    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Ovarian Stimulation for IVF using GnRH Antagonists: Comparing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol.(A/ACP) With the “Conventional” Antagonist Approach
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • The “Biological Clock” and how it should Influence the Selection and Design of Ovarian Stimulation Protocols for IVF.
    • A Rational Basis for selecting Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) protocols in women with Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR)
    • Diagnosing and Treating Infertility due to Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR)
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in Older women and Women who have Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR): A Rational Basis for Selecting a Stimulation Protocol
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Blastocyst Embryo Transfers should be the Standard of Care in IVF
    • Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET) versus “Fresh” ET: How to Make the Decision
    • Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET): A Rational Approach to Hormonal Preparation and How new Methodology is Impacting IVF.
    • Staggered IVF: An Excellent Option When. Advancing Age and Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR) Reduces IVF Success Rate
    • Embryo Banking/Stockpiling: Slows the “Biological Clock” and offers a Selective Alternative to IVF-Egg Donation.
    • Preimplantation Genetic Testing (PGS) in IVF: It should be Used Selectively and NOT be Routine.
    • Preimplantation Genetic Sampling (PGS) Using: Next Generation Gene Sequencing (NGS): Method of Choice.
    • PGS in IVF: Are Some Chromosomally Abnormal Embryos Capable of Resulting in Normal Babies and Being Wrongly Discarded?
    • PGS and Assessment of Egg/Embryo “competency”: How Method, Timing and Methodology Could Affect Reliability
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas:
    • Traveling for IVF from Out of State/Country–
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • How Many Embryos should be transferred: A Critical Decision in IVF.
    • The Role of Nutritional Supplements in Preparing for IVF
    • Premature Luteinization (“the premature LH surge): Why it happens and how it can be prevented.
    • IVF Egg Donation: A Comprehensive Overview

    If you are interested in seeking my advice or services, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com .

    *FYI
    The 4th edition of my newest book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoffrey Sher MD

  • Noush - June 16, 2018 reply

    Hi Dr. I have two cysts on one of my ovaries. Together they are the size of a tennis ball. I can’t feel them most of the time. I had one cyst for over 5 years, and the other recently appeared after the last IVF treatment. I am considering doing another round in Spain. The long protocol (with microdiol and procrin) has been suggested as I have some endometriosis on the outside of my uterus, the cysts and have miscarried before. How likely is it that the stimulations will cause the cysts to grow? Thank you

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - June 23, 2018 reply

    These are likely not “functional cysts. They have been there too long. Eitgher they are tumoroous cysts or endometriomas and need to be addressed surgically before doing IVF.

    Here is the protocol I advise for women, <40Y who have adequate ovarian reserve.
    My advice is to use a long pituitary down regulation protocol starting on a BCP, and overlapping it with Lupron 10U daily for three (3) days and then stopping the BCP but continuing on Lupron 10u daily (in my opinion 20U daily is too much) and await a period (which should ensue within 5-7 days of stopping the BCP). At that point an US examination is done along with a baseline measurement of blood estradiol to exclude a functional ovarian cyst and simultaneously, the Lupron dosage is reduced to 5U daily to be continued until the hCG (10,000u) trigger. An FSH-dominant gonadotropin such as Follistim, Puregon or Gonal-f daily is started with the period for 2 days and then the gonadotropin dosage is reduced and a small amount of menotropin (Menopur---no more than 75U daily) is added. This is continued until US and blood estradiol levels indicate that the hCG trigger be given, whereupon an ER is done 36h later. I personally would advise against using Lupron in “flare protocol” arrangement (where the Lupron commences with the onset of gonadotropin administration.
    I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.
    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Use of GnRH Antagonists (Ganirelix/Cetrotide/Orgalutron) in IVF-Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas
    • Should IVF Treatment Cycles be provided uninterrupted or be Conducted in 7-12 Pre-scheduled “Batches” per Year
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • “Triggering” Egg Maturation in IVF: Comparing urine-derived hCG, Recombinant DNA-hCG and GnRH-agonist:
    If you are interested in seeking my advice or services, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com .

    *FYI
    The 4th edition of my newest book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoffrey Sher MD

  • Tina - March 1, 2018 reply

    Hello Dr. Sher, I have a question for you. My partner & I are doing RIVF, we are ready to start IVF for me to carry. Two weeks ago I went in for my baseline ultrasound & there was a cyst on my left ovary. Was told not to start my meds, stay on my birth control, & to come back for a recheck in 2 weeks for recheck. Today was my recheck & the cyst is still there. I have Polycystic Kidney Disease & I know this can cause there to be cysts on other places as well. I had a sucessfull pregnancy 14 years ago, & I can’t ever remember a time there wasn’t at least one cyst on an ovary when I’ve had scans in the past. My Doctor left me a message that she prefers I do another recheck in 2 weeks but if I wanted to proceed & start my meds that she feels “confident in starting but starting knowing this could impact my outcome”. Just wanted to see what you thought about this. Other than the PKD, I am a healthy 33 year old without any infertility issues. Thank you so much for your time!

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - March 2, 2018 reply

    I do not believe that the SCI result has anything to do with your losses. Nor does mild to moderate endometriosis or its surgical treatment represent a useful approach…in my opinion. I suspect that you do have an implantation dysfunction though, and that this could in part be linked to a hitherto unaddressed immunologic endometrial dysfunction.

    When it comes to reproduction, humans are the poorest performers of all mammals. In fact we are so inefficient that up to 75% of fertilized eggs do not produce live births, and up to 30% of pregnancies end up being lost within 10 weeks of conception (in the first trimester). RPL is defined as two (2) or more failed pregnancies. Less than 5% of women will experience two (2) consecutive miscarriages, and only 1% experience three or more.
    Pregnancy loss can be classified by the stage of pregnancy when the loss occurs:
    • Early pregnancy loss (first trimester)
    • Late pregnancy loss (after the first trimester)
    • Occult “hidden” and not clinically recognized, (chemical) pregnancy loss (occurs prior to ultrasound confirmation of pregnancy)
    • Early pregnancy losses usually occur sporadically (are not repetitive).
    In more than 70% of cases the loss is due to embryo aneuploidy (where there are more or less than the normal quota of 46 chromosomes). Conversely, repeated losses (RPL), with isolated exceptions where the cause is structural (e.g., unbalanced translocations), are seldom attributable to numerical chromosomal abnormalities (aneuploidy). In fact, the vast majority of cases of RPL are attributable to non-chromosomal causes such as anatomical uterine abnormalities or Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID).
    Since most sporadic early pregnancy losses are induced by chromosomal factors and thus are non-repetitive, having had a single miscarriage the likelihood of a second one occurring is no greater than average. However, once having had two losses the chance of a third one occurring is double (35-40%) and after having had three losses the chance of a fourth miscarriage increases to about 60%. The reason for this is that the more miscarriages a woman has, the greater is the likelihood of this being due to a non-chromosomal (repetitive) cause such as IID. It follows that if numerical chromosomal analysis (karyotyping) of embryonic/fetal products derived from a miscarriage tests karyotypically normal, then by a process of elimination, there would be a strong likelihood of a miscarriage repeating in subsequent pregnancies and one would not have to wait for the disaster to recur before taking action. This is precisely why we strongly advocate that all miscarriage specimens be karyotyped.
    There is however one caveat to be taken into consideration. That is that the laboratory performing the karyotyping might unwittingly be testing the mother’s cells rather than that of the conceptus. That is why it is not possible to confidently exclude aneuploidy in cases where karyotyping of products suggests a “chromosomally normal” (euploid) female.
    Late pregnancy losses (occurring after completion of the 1st trimester/12th week) occur far less frequently (1%) than early pregnancy losses. They are most commonly due to anatomical abnormalities of the uterus and/or cervix. Weakness of the neck of the cervix rendering it able to act as an effective valve that retains the pregnancy (i.e., cervical incompetence) is in fact one of the commonest causes of late pregnancy loss. So also are developmental (congenital) abnormalities of the uterus (e.g., a uterine septum) and uterine fibroid tumors. In some cases intrauterine growth retardation, premature separation of the placenta (placental abruption), premature rupture of the membranes and premature labor can also causes of late pregnancy loss.
    Much progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in RPL. There are two broad categories:
    1. Problems involving the uterine environment in which a normal embryo is prohibited from properly implanting and developing. Possible causes include:
    • Inadequate thickening of the uterine lining
    • Irregularity in the contour of the uterine cavity (polyps, fibroid tumors in the uterine wall, intra-uterine scarring and adenomyosis)
    • Hormonal imbalances (progesterone deficiency or luteal phase defects). This most commonly results in occult RPL.
    • Deficient blood flow to the uterine lining (thin uterine lining).
    • Immunologic implantation dysfunction (IID). A major cause of RPL. Plays a role in 75% of cases where chromosomally normal preimplantation embryos fail to implant.
    • Interference of blood supply to the developing conceptus can occur due to a hereditary clotting disorder known as Thrombophilia.
    2. Genetic and/or structural chromosomal abnormality of the embryo.Genetic abnormalities are rare causes of RPL. Structural chromosomal abnormalities are slightly more common but are also occur infrequently (1%). These are referred to as unbalanced translocation and they result from part of one chromosome detaching and then fusing with another chromosome. Additionally, a number of studies suggest the existence of paternal (sperm derived) effect on human embryo quality and pregnancy outcome that are not reflected as a chromosomal abnormality. Damaged sperm DNA can have a negative impact on fetal development and present clinically as occult or early clinical miscarriage. The Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA) which measures the same endpoints are newer and possibly improved methods for evaluating.

    IMMUNOLOGIC IMPLANTATION DYSFUNCTION
    Autoimmune IID: Here an immunologic reaction is produced by the individual to his/her body’s own cellular components. The most common antibodies that form in such situations are APA and antithyroid antibodies (ATA).
    But it is only when specialized immune cells in the uterine lining, known as cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells, become activated and start to release an excessive/disproportionate amount of TH-1 cytokines that attack the root system of the embryo, that implantation potential is jeopardized. Diagnosis of such activation requires highly specialized blood test for cytokine activity that can only be performed by a handful of reproductive immunology reference laboratories in the United States.
    Alloimmune IID, i.e., where antibodies are formed against antigens derived from another member of the same species, is believed to be a relatively common immunologic cause of recurrent pregnancy loss.
    Autoimmune IID is often genetically transmitted. Thus it should not be surprising to learn that it is more likely to exist in women who have a family (or personal) history of primary autoimmune diseases such as lupus erythematosus (LE), scleroderma or autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Grave’s disease), rheumatoid arthritis, etc. Reactionary (secondary) autoimmunity can occur in conjunction with any medical condition associated with widespread tissue damage. One such gynecologic condition is endometriosis. Since autoimmune IID is usually associated with activated NK and T-cells from the outset, it usually results in such very early destruction of the embryo’s root system that the patient does not even recognize that she is pregnant. Accordingly the condition usually presents as “unexplained infertility” or “unexplained IVF failure” rather than as a miscarriage.

    Alloimmune IID, on the other hand, usually starts off presenting as unexplained miscarriages (often manifesting as RPL). Over time as NK/T cell activation builds and eventually becomes permanently established the patient often goes from RPL to “infertility” due to failed implantation. RPL is more commonly the consequence of alloimmune rather than autoimmune implantation dysfunction.
    However, regardless, of whether miscarriage is due to autoimmune or alloimmune implantation dysfunction the final blow to the pregnancy is the result of activated NK cells and CTL in the uterine lining that damage the developing embryo’s “root system” (trophoblast) so that it can no longer sustain the growing conceptus. This having been said, it is important to note that autoimmune IID is readily amenable to reversal through timely, appropriately administered, selective immunotherapy, and alloimmune IID is not. It is much more difficult to treat successfully, even with the use of immunotherapy. In fact, in some cases the only solution will be to revert to selective immunotherapy plus using donor sperm (provided there is no “match” between the donor’s DQa profile and that of the female recipient) or alternatively to resort to gestational surrogacy.
    DIAGNOSING THE CAUSE OF RPL
    In the past, women who miscarried were not evaluated thoroughly until they had lost several pregnancies in a row. This was because sporadic miscarriages are most commonly the result of embryo numerical chromosomal irregularities (aneuploidy) and thus not treatable. However, a consecutive series of miscarriages points to a repetitive cause that is non-chromosomal and is potentially remediable. Since RPL is most commonly due to a uterine pathology or immunologic causes that are potentially treatable, it follows that early chromosomal evaluation of products of conception could point to a potentially treatable situation. Thus I strongly recommend that such testing be done in most cases of miscarriage. Doing so will avoid a great deal of unnecessary heartache for many patients.
    Establishing the correct diagnosis is the first step toward determining effective treatment for couples with RPL. It results from a problem within the pregnancy itself or within the uterine environment where the pregnancy implants and grows. Diagnostic tests useful in identifying individuals at greater risk for a problem within the pregnancy itself include:

    • Karyotyping (chromosome analysis) both prospective parents
    • Assessment of the karyotype of products of conception derived from previous miscarriage specimens
    • Ultrasound examination of the uterine cavity after sterile water is injected or sonohysterogram, fluid ultrasound, etc.)
    • Hysterosalpingogram (dye X-ray test)
    • Hysteroscopic evaluation of the uterine cavity
    • Full hormonal evaluation (estrogen, progesterone, adrenal steroid hormones, thyroid hormones, FSH/LH, etc.)
    • Immunologic testing to include:
    a) Antiphospholipid antibody (APA) panel
    b) Antinuclear antibody (ANA) panel
    c) Antithyroid antibody panel (i.e., antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies)
    d) Reproductive immunophenotype
    e) Natural killer cell activity (NKa) assay (i.e., K562 target cell test)
    f) Alloimmune testing of both the male and female partners
    TREATMENT OF RPL
    Treatment for Anatomic Abnormalities of the Uterus: This involves restoration through removal of local lesions such as fibroids, scar tissue, and endometrial polyps or timely insertion of a cervical cerclage (a stitch placed around the neck of the weakened cervix) or the excision of a uterine septum when indicated.
    Treatment of Thin Uterine Lining: A thin uterine lining has been shown to correlate with compromised pregnancy outcome. Often this will be associated with reduced blood flow to the endometrium. Such decreased blood flow to the uterus can be improved through treatment with sildenafil and possibly aspirin.
    Sildenafil (Viagra) Therapy. Viagra has been used successfully to increase uterine blood flow. However, to be effective it must be administered starting as soon as the period stops up until the day of ovulation and it must be administered vaginally (not orally). Viagra in the form of vaginal suppositories given in the dosage of 25 mg four times a day has been shown to increase uterine blood flow as well as thickness of the uterine lining. To date, we have seen significant improvement of the thickness of the uterine lining in about 70% of women treated. Successful pregnancy resulted in 42% of women who responded to the Viagra. It should be remembered that most of these women had previously experienced repeated IVF failures.

    Use of Aspirin: This is an anti-prostaglandin that improves blood flow to the endometrium. It is administered at a dosage of 81 mg orally, daily from the beginning of the cycle until ovulation.
    Treating Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction with Selective Immunotherapy: Modalities such as IL/IVIg, heparinoids (Lovenox/Clexane), and corticosteroids (dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone) can be used in select cases depending on autoimmune or alloimmune dysfunction.
    The Use of IVF in the Treatment of RPL
    In the following circumstances, IVF is the preferred option:
    1. When in addition to a history of RPL, another standard indication for IVF (e.g., tubal factor, endometriosis, and male factor infertility) is superimposed.
    2. In cases where selective immunotherapy is needed to treat an immunologic implantation dysfunction.
    The reason for IVF being a preferred approach in such cases is that in order to be effective, the immunotherapy needs to be initiated well before spontaneous or induced ovulation. Given the fact that the anticipated birthrate per cycle of COS with or without IUI is at best about 15%, it follows that short of IVF, to have even a reasonable chance of a live birth, most women with immunologic causes of RPL would need to undergo immunotherapy repeatedly, over consecutive cycles. Conversely, with IVF, the chance of a successful outcome in a single cycle of treatment is several times greater and, because of the attenuated and concentrated time period required for treatment, IVF is far safer and thus represents a more practicable alternative
    Since embryo aneuploidy is a common cause of miscarriage, the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), with tests such as CGH, can provide a valuable diagnostic and therapeutic advantage in cases of RPL. PGD requires IVF to provide access to embryos for testing.
    There are a few cases of intractable alloimmune dysfunction due to absolute DQ alpha matching where Gestational Surrogacy or use of donor sperm could represent the only viable recourse, other than abandoning treatment altogether and/or resorting to adoption. Other non-immunologic factors such as an intractably thin uterine lining or severe uterine pathology might also warrant that last resort consideration be given to gestational surrogacy.
    The good news is that if a couple with RPL is open to all of the diagnostic and treatment options referred to above, a live birthrate of 70%–80% is ultimately achievable.

    I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.
    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Ovarian Stimulation for IVF using GnRH Antagonists: Comparing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol.(A/ACP) With the “Conventional” Antagonist Approach
    • Ovarian Stimulation in Women Who have Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR): Introducing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion protocol
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Blastocyst Embryo Transfers Should be the Standard of Care in IVF
    • IVF: How Many Attempts should be considered before Stopping?
    • “Unexplained” Infertility: Often a matter of the Diagnosis Being Overlooked!
    • IVF Failure and Implantation Dysfunction:
    • The Role of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 1-Background
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 2- Making a Diagnosis
    • Immunologic Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 3-Treatment
    • Thyroid autoantibodies and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction: Importance of Meticulous Evaluation and Strategic Management:(Case Report
    • Intralipid and IVIG therapy: Understanding the Basis for its use in the Treatment of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Intralipid (IL) Administration in IVF: It’s Composition; How it Works; Administration; Side-effects; Reactions and Precautions
    • Natural Killer Cell Activation (NKa) and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction in IVF: The Controversy!
    • Endometrial Thickness, Uterine Pathology and Immunologic Factors
    • Vaginally Administered Viagra is Often a Highly Effective Treatment to Help Thicken a Thin Uterine Lining
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas:
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • How Many Embryos should be transferred: A Critical Decision in IVF.
    • The Role of Nutritional Supplements in Preparing for IVF

    If you are interested in seeking my advice or services, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com .

    *FYI
    The 4th edition of my newest book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoffrey Sher MD

    Ammara - April 18, 2018 reply

    Hi Dr. Sher, I have a question for you. I’m doing a IVF/ICSI with PGS and in my first stimulation cycle, 12 eggs were retrieved out of which 7 embryos of good quality were freezed. My egg retrieval was on 31st March, 2018. Doctor suggested me to go for 2nd stimulation cycle so to get a good number of embryos for PGS and decided to utilize April cycle but after my egg retrieval I’m detected with a cyst in my right ovary with slight pain, especially during sleeping or changing position. Doctor suggested to wait till my periods and if cyst dissolve. I had Decapeptyl injection and primoult-N tablet before periods and started my periods on 14 April, today is almost end ofperiods but still there is pain and now I need to start my Gonal F injections on 5th day of my cycle(which is tomorrow) is it safe to go for 2nd stimulation with this cyst or Can I go for needle aspiration during stimulation? Would there be any effect on my eggs quality. In first stimulation my E2 was v high >4000. My age is 35. I really appreciate your response on my questions.
    Thanks in advance for your help.
    Thanks & Regards

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - April 18, 2018 reply

    An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. An ovarian follicle that is larger than 22mm is termed a functional follicular cyst. They are non-malignant (benign) and harmless and in most cases, don’t even cause symptoms, however, in some cases, rapid distention of the cyst , or rupture with bleeding , can lead to sudden and severe pain and in some cases, a disruption in hormone balance leads to vaginal bleeding.

    There are 2 varieties of “functional ovarian cysts:
    1. Follicle Cysts: In menstruating women, a follicle containing the unfertilized egg will rupture during ovulation. If this does not occur, a follicular cyst of more than 2.5 cm diameter may result. These cysts develop in response to stimulation with follicle stimulating hormone that is either self-produced (by the woman’s own pituitary gland (endogenous) or is induced by agonists (e.g. Lupron/Decapeptyl/Buserelin) that sometimes propagate increased and sustained pituitary FSH release.
    2. Corpus luteum cysts: These appear after ovulation or egg retrieval. The corpus luteum is the remnant of the follicle after the ovum has moved to the fallopian tubes. It usually degrades within 5-9 days. A corpus luteum of > 3 cm is regarded as being cystic.

    A:Follicular cysts: These lesions have special relevance in women about to undergo controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) with gonadotropins for IVF where they can literally, “throw a spanner in the works”, causing a delay, postponement and sometimes even cancellation of the cycle of treatment.

    Functional Ovarian cysts must be distinguished from “non-functional or cystic ovarian tumors”. By definition, “tumors are capable of independent growth. Thus “cystic ovarian tumors do not develop as a result of exposure to gonadotropin stimulation and it is this feature that distinguishes them from “functional” ovarian cysts.

    Aside from sometimes causing pain and dysfunctional uterine bleeding, unruptured follicular cysts are usually relatively non-problematic. As stated above, in some cases, functional “cysts” undergo rapid distention (often as a result of a minor degree of bleeding inside the cyst itself). In such cases the woman will often experience a sharp or aching pain on one or other side of her lower abdomen and/or deep seated pain during intercourse. The cysts may even rupture, causing sudden lower abdominal pain that exacerbates and may even simulate an attack of acute appendicitis or a ruptured ectopic (tubular) pregnancy. While very unpleasant, a ruptured “functional cyst” seldom produces a degree of internal bleeding that warrants surgical intervention. The pain, typically is made worse by movement. It stabilizes within a number of days but subsides progressively to disappear within about four to seven days.

    Whenever an ovarian cyst is detected (usually by ultrasound examination), the first consideration should be to determine whether it is a “functional cyst or a “cystic ovarian tumor”. The reason for this is that tumors are subject to a variety of complications such as twisting (torsion), hemorrhage, infection and even malignant change, all of which usually will require surgical intervention.

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) such as Lupron, Buserelin, Nafarelin and Synarel, administered daily, starting a few days prior to menstruation, all elicit an initial and rapid, out-pouring (“surge”) in pituitary LH and FSH release. This “surge” lasts for a day or two. Then as the pituitary reservoir of FSH and LH becomes depleted, the blood FSH and LH levels fall rapidly reaching near undetectable blood levels within a day or two. At the same time, the declining FSH result in a drop in blood E2 concentration leading to a withdrawal bleed (menstruation). The progressive exhaustion of Pituitary FSH/LH along with the decline in blood E2, is referred to as ” down-regulation” The continued daily administration of GnRHa or its replacement (supplanting) with a GnRH antagonist (e.g. Ganirelix, Cetrotide or Orgalutron) results in blood LH concentrations being sustained at a very low level throughout the ensuing cycle of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with gonadotropins, thereby optimizing follicular maturation and promoting E2 induced endometrial proliferation.

    Functional follicular cysts resulting from controlled ovarian stimulation (COS), can occur regardless of whether down regulation with GnRHa (Lupron/Buserelin/Decapeptyl) is initiated in cases where the cycle of stimulation is launched with the woman coming off a BCP or when the agonist is initiated on day 20-23 (the mid luteal phase) of a natural cycle. When this happens it is due to the initial agonist-induced FSH “surge” sometimes so accelerating follicular growth that it leads to the development of one or more “functional follicular cysts”. These cysts release E2 and cause the blood E2 often to remain elevated (>70pg/ml). Depending on the extent of this effect, it sometimes leads to a delay in the onset of menstruation and thus also to deferment in the initiation of COS.

    Failure of menstruation to commence within 4-7 days of initiating treatment with GnRHa suggestive of an underlying “functional ovarian cyst” and calls for an ultrasound examination to make the diagnosis. Once diagnosed, depending upon the number and size of cysts detected. There are two therapeutic options:
    1) Wait for the cyst to absorb spontaneously and for menstruation to ensue: While it at first might seem that this approach of continuing GnRHa therapy in order to cause absorption of the cyst(s) within a week or two might be a good approach , it often has unintended consequences. First there is the real possibility that prolonged uninterrupted GnRHa therapy might blunt subsequent ovarian follicular response to gonadotropin therapy and second, if menstruation does not follow within 10-14 days, the cycle will usually need to be cancelled.
    2) Immediate needle aspiration of the cyst(s) under local anesthesia. I personally favor needle aspiration, sooner rather than later in such cases. Menstruation will usually follow a successful aspiration within 2-4 days. Upon menstruation a blood E2 level is measured and as soon as it drops below 70pg/ml COS can be initiated.

    B. Corpus Luteum cysts: As with follicular cysts, so at times do Corpus Luteum cysts also bleed, distend and cause fain. They often delay onset of spontaneous menstruation by a week or longer (Halban syndrome”.). In isolated cases, internal bleeding within the cyst substance causes pain, rapid enlargement of the lesion and by ultrasound examination reveals local areas of absorption causing it to appear as a “complex” cystic lesion that simulates a tumor, prompting surgical intervention. Sadly, there are countless cases where women have had an entire ovary removed due to this happening.

    “Functional ovarian cysts” rarely present as a serious health hazard. In the vast majority of cases they spontaneously resolve within 2-4 weeks while “cystic tumors” will not. Accordingly, the persistence of any ovarian cyst that persists for longer than 4 weeks should raise suspicion of it being a tumor rather than with a “functional cyst”. Since ovarian tumors can be (or become) malignant, all ovarian cysts that persist for longer than 6 weeks (whether occurring in non-pregnant or pregnant women), should be considered for surgical removal and this should be followed by pathological analysis.

    Geoff Sher

  • Shal - February 22, 2018 reply

    Hello, My husband and I are planning for a FET in the next month or two and have questions. I have been diagnosed with an ovarian cyst Sept 2017 on my left side ovary. It measures 2.12 x 1.8 x 1 cm in size and has been this size when I first checked in Sept and last checked with ultrasound in mid January 2018. I have minimal manageable pain symptoms and would like to know if I should be concerned with whether it would pose an issue for my upcoming FET cycle. Also, does the ovarian cyst tumor pose issue for fetus once established?

    Thanks in advance.
    Shal

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - February 22, 2018 reply

    Of course it is wise to assess what tyope of cyst this is. For it to be present for 5-6 months suggests that it might not be a functional cyst. It could be an endometrioma or a tumorous cyst. If the former it would in my opinion be wisae to test for Immunologic implantation dysfunction prior to FET and if it is a tumor, that needs also to be assessed and addressed.

    Geoff Sher

  • Marwa - January 21, 2018 reply

    Ihave failed ICSI on day 11 last decmeber .I Had my menses this time earlier by 1week i,I have us done 3rd day of period it showed functional overian cyst 4cm ,my doctor started me on estradiol 2mg twice daily for 10 days and to have another US after that .. we are planning to have freezed embryo transfere he blieved we shouldnot postpond that even that cyst is there.
    I am litle pit warried should I proceed for embryo transfe?

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - January 21, 2018 reply

    In my opinion, having had a period, do not believe hat the functional cyst will compromise an FET.

    Geoff Sher

  • Gulnara Chiang - August 10, 2017 reply

    Hello Dr.Sher,
    I have primed with Estrogen n HGH in May for 30days, resulted in Cyst n endometrioma in June n Cycle was cancelled, I was told to continue HGH In June Cycle. In July Cycle US showed the same Cyst n endometrioma n I had surgery to remove them n endometriosis. N today I’m on CD 35, haven’t started my cycle, my Estradiol is 1240 n I have a new cyst on my right ovary. I’m still on HGH. And to bring down my Estrogen level I was prescribed Ganirelix shots nightly for 5days. Do you think being on HGH for 4th month affected my cycle? Will ganirelix help me get my cycle started? Thank you

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - August 10, 2017 reply

    An endometrioma is not something brought babout by HGH. Also, unlike a “functional cyst ( endometrioma’s tak many months to develop and do not produce estrogen. So I think what you now have is probably a ‘functional cyst”.An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. An ovarian follicle that is larger than 22mm is termed a functional follicular cyst. They are non-malignant (benign) and harmless and in most cases, don’t even cause symptoms, however, in some cases, rapid distention of the cyst , or rupture with bleeding , can lead to sudden and severe pain and in some cases, a disruption in hormone balance leads to vaginal bleeding.

    There are 2 varieties of “functional ovarian cysts:
    1. Follicle Cysts: In menstruating women, a follicle containing the unfertilized egg will rupture during ovulation. If this does not occur, a follicular cyst of more than 2.5 cm diameter may result. These cysts develop in response to stimulation with follicle stimulating hormone that is either self-produced (by the woman’s own pituitary gland (endogenous) or is induced by agonists (e.g. Lupron/Decapeptyl/Buserelin) that sometimes propagate increased and sustained pituitary FSH release.
    2. Corpus luteum cysts: These appear after ovulation or egg retrieval. The corpus luteum is the remnant of the follicle after the ovum has moved to the fallopian tubes. It usually degrades within 5-9 days. A corpus luteum of > 3 cm is regarded as being cystic.

    A:Follicular cysts: These lesions have special relevance in women about to undergo controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) with gonadotropins for IVF where they can literally, “throw a spanner in the works”, causing a delay, postponement and sometimes even cancellation of the cycle of treatment.

    Functional Ovarian cysts must be distinguished from “non-functional or cystic ovarian tumors”. By definition, “tumors are capable of independent growth. Thus “cystic ovarian tumors do not develop as a result of exposure to gonadotropin stimulation and it is this feature that distinguishes them from “functional” ovarian cysts.

    Aside from sometimes causing pain and dysfunctional uterine bleeding, unruptured follicular cysts are usually relatively non-problematic. As stated above, in some cases, functional “cysts” undergo rapid distention (often as a result of a minor degree of bleeding inside the cyst itself). In such cases the woman will often experience a sharp or aching pain on one or other side of her lower abdomen and/or deep seated pain during intercourse. The cysts may even rupture, causing sudden lower abdominal pain that exacerbates and may even simulate an attack of acute appendicitis or a ruptured ectopic (tubular) pregnancy. While very unpleasant, a ruptured “functional cyst” seldom produces a degree of internal bleeding that warrants surgical intervention. The pain, typically is made worse by movement. It stabilizes within a number of days but subsides progressively to disappear within about four to seven days.

    Whenever an ovarian cyst is detected (usually by ultrasound examination), the first consideration should be to determine whether it is a “functional cyst or a “cystic ovarian tumor”. The reason for this is that tumors are subject to a variety of complications such as twisting (torsion), hemorrhage, infection and even malignant change, all of which usually will require surgical intervention.

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) such as Lupron, Buserelin, Nafarelin and Synarel, administered daily, starting a few days prior to menstruation, all elicit an initial and rapid, out-pouring (“surge”) in pituitary LH and FSH release. This “surge” lasts for a day or two. Then as the pituitary reservoir of FSH and LH becomes depleted, the blood FSH and LH levels fall rapidly reaching near undetectable blood levels within a day or two. At the same time, the declining FSH result in a drop in blood E2 concentration leading to a withdrawal bleed (menstruation). The progressive exhaustion of Pituitary FSH/LH along with the decline in blood E2, is referred to as ” down-regulation” The continued daily administration of GnRHa or its replacement (supplanting) with a GnRH antagonist (e.g. Ganirelix, Cetrotide or Orgalutron) results in blood LH concentrations being sustained at a very low level throughout the ensuing cycle of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with gonadotropins, thereby optimizing follicular maturation and promoting E2 induced endometrial proliferation.

    Functional follicular cysts resulting from controlled ovarian stimulation (COS), can occur regardless of whether down regulation with GnRHa (Lupron/Buserelin/Decapeptyl) is initiated in cases where the cycle of stimulation is launched with the woman coming off a BCP or when the agonist is initiated on day 20-23 (the mid luteal phase) of a natural cycle. When this happens it is due to the initial agonist-induced FSH “surge” sometimes so accelerating follicular growth that it leads to the development of one or more “functional follicular cysts”. These cysts release E2 and cause the blood E2 often to remain elevated (>70pg/ml). Depending on the extent of this effect, it sometimes leads to a delay in the onset of menstruation and thus also to deferment in the initiation of COS.

    Failure of menstruation to commence within 4-7 days of initiating treatment with GnRHa suggestive of an underlying “functional ovarian cyst” and calls for an ultrasound examination to make the diagnosis. Once diagnosed, depending upon the number and size of cysts detected. There are two therapeutic options:
    1) Wait for the cyst to absorb spontaneously and for menstruation to ensue: While it at first might seem that this approach of continuing GnRHa therapy in order to cause absorption of the cyst(s) within a week or two might be a good approach , it often has unintended consequences. First there is the real possibility that prolonged uninterrupted GnRHa therapy might blunt subsequent ovarian follicular response to gonadotropin therapy and second, if menstruation does not follow within 10-14 days, the cycle will usually need to be cancelled.
    2) Immediate needle aspiration of the cyst(s) under local anesthesia. I personally favor needle aspiration, sooner rather than later in such cases. Menstruation will usually follow a successful aspiration within 2-4 days. Upon menstruation a blood E2 level is measured and as soon as it drops below 70pg/ml COS can be initiated.

    B. Corpus Luteum cysts: As with follicular cysts, so at times do Corpus Luteum cysts also bleed, distend and cause fain. They often delay onset of spontaneous menstruation by a week or longer (Halban syndrome”.). In isolated cases, internal bleeding within the cyst substance causes pain, rapid enlargement of the lesion and by ultrasound examination reveals local areas of absorption causing it to appear as a “complex” cystic lesion that simulates a tumor, prompting surgical intervention. Sadly, there are countless cases where women have had an entire ovary removed due to this happening.

    “Functional ovarian cysts” rarely present as a serious health hazard. In the vast majority of cases they spontaneously resolve within 2-4 weeks while “cystic tumors” will not. Accordingly, the persistence of any ovarian cyst that persists for longer than 4 weeks should raise suspicion of it being a tumor rather than with a “functional cyst”. Since ovarian tumors can be (or become) malignant, all ovarian cysts that persist for longer than 6 weeks (whether occurring in non-pregnant or pregnant women), should be considered for surgical removal and this should be followed by pathological analysis.

    If you are interested in seeking my advice or services, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com.

    *FYI
    The 4th edition of my newest book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoffrey Sher

  • Leonard hendrina - May 3, 2017 reply

    I have 4cm haemorrhahic ovary cyst. Im trying to use egg donor. Will the cyst not affect embryo transfer and implantation

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - May 3, 2017 reply

    It should not do so with OD.

    Geoff Sher

  • Corina - July 25, 2016 reply

    Dr. Sher, I had a MC last year during the summer after a fresh cycle and I am preparing right now for a FET cycle. End of May I was put on Lupron on day 15 only to find out during the baseline ultrasound and B/W on day 3 that I had developed two large cysts that produced E2. (My level at baseline was 1,012). The clinic increased the Lupron dosage from 10 units to 20 for a subsequent week but the cysts were still there and the E2 level sank to 512. I decided to cancel the cycle due to timing issues. A couple of weeks later I went back for ultrasound and B/W and the cysts shrank to less than 14mm. Now, another couple of weeks later, I started again with Lupron, but this time on day 21 and I was supposed to call in for ultrasound and B/W with the onset of my period. I have been on 10 units Lupron for the past 10 days and I still have no period. The period was supposed ho Show 5 days ago. Besides breast tenderness I had no other side effects over the last week. Is it possible that Lupron has a reverse effect on me and every time I take it, cysts are forming or rather developing? And if yes, what is an alternative protocol for me? I have normally a very regular mentruation with a regular ovulation (I feel it every month due to the mittelschmerz) but since I am an out of town patient the clinic prefers me to be on the long Lupron protocol. Please advise as I will be having another ultrasound and B/W panel done tomorrow and I am afraid that I will put again on a higher Lupron dose which will give me the same outcome as last time. I would prefer an aspiration but I was told that if the cyst produces E2 it will not help. Thank you Corina

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - July 25, 2016 reply

    Hi Corina,

    It is not that unusual to develop cysts on Lupron. In my practice I am much more aggressive. Rather than simply waiting for them to absorb, I aspirate them transvaginally under local anaesthetic. This usually results in a period within a few days and we VERY rarely have to postpone the cycle for long or cancel it. The other alternative is to use a BCP (without Lupron) and start the hormone therapy with the onset of the period.

    An ovarian cyst is any collection of fluid, surrounded by a very thin wall, within an ovary. An ovarian follicle that is larger than 22mm is termed a functional follicular cyst. They are non-malignant (benign) and harmless and in most cases, don’t even cause symptoms, however, in some cases, rapid distention of the cyst , or rupture with bleeding , can lead to sudden and severe pain and in some cases, a disruption in hormone balance leads to vaginal bleeding.

    There are 2 varieties of “functional ovarian cysts:
    1. Follicle Cysts: In menstruating women, a follicle containing the unfertilized egg will rupture during ovulation. If this does not occur, a follicular cyst of more than 2.5 cm diameter may result. These cysts develop in response to stimulation with follicle stimulating hormone that is either self-produced (by the woman’s own pituitary gland (endogenous) or is induced by agonists (e.g. Lupron/Decapeptyl/Buserelin) that sometimes propagate increased and sustained pituitary FSH release.
    2. Corpus luteum cysts: These appear after ovulation or egg retrieval. The corpus luteum is the remnant of the follicle after the ovum has moved to the fallopian tubes. It usually degrades within 5-9 days. A corpus luteum of > 3 cm is regarded as being cystic.

    A:Follicular cysts: These lesions have special relevance in women about to undergo controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) with gonadotropins for IVF where they can literally, “throw a spanner in the works”, causing a delay, postponement and sometimes even cancellation of the cycle of treatment.

    Functional Ovarian cysts must be distinguished from “non-functional or cystic ovarian tumors”. By definition, “tumors are capable of independent growth. Thus “cystic ovarian tumors do not develop as a result of exposure to gonadotropin stimulation and it is this feature that distinguishes them from “functional” ovarian cysts.

    Aside from sometimes causing pain and dysfunctional uterine bleeding, unruptured follicular cysts are usually relatively non-problematic. As stated above, in some cases, functional “cysts” undergo rapid distention (often as a result of a minor degree of bleeding inside the cyst itself). In such cases the woman will often experience a sharp or aching pain on one or other side of her lower abdomen and/or deep seated pain during intercourse. The cysts may even rupture, causing sudden lower abdominal pain that exacerbates and may even simulate an attack of acute appendicitis or a ruptured ectopic (tubular) pregnancy. While very unpleasant, a ruptured “functional cyst” seldom produces a degree of internal bleeding that warrants surgical intervention. The pain, typically is made worse by movement. It stabilizes within a number of days but subsides progressively to disappear within about four to seven days.

    Whenever an ovarian cyst is detected (usually by ultrasound examination), the first consideration should be to determine whether it is a “functional cyst or a “cystic ovarian tumor”. The reason for this is that tumors are subject to a variety of complications such as twisting (torsion), hemorrhage, infection and even malignant change, all of which usually will require surgical intervention.

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) such as Lupron, Buserelin, Nafarelin and Synarel, administered daily, starting a few days prior to menstruation, all elicit an initial and rapid, out-pouring (“surge”) in pituitary LH and FSH release. This “surge” lasts for a day or two. Then as the pituitary reservoir of FSH and LH becomes depleted, the blood FSH and LH levels fall rapidly reaching near undetectable blood levels within a day or two. At the same time, the declining FSH result in a drop in blood E2 concentration leading to a withdrawal bleed (menstruation). The progressive exhaustion of Pituitary FSH/LH along with the decline in blood E2, is referred to as ” down-regulation” The continued daily administration of GnRHa or its replacement (supplanting) with a GnRH antagonist (e.g. Ganirelix, Cetrotide or Orgalutron) results in blood LH concentrations being sustained at a very low level throughout the ensuing cycle of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with gonadotropins, thereby optimizing follicular maturation and promoting E2 induced endometrial proliferation.

    Functional follicular cysts resulting from controlled ovarian stimulation (COS), can occur regardless of whether down regulation with GnRHa (Lupron/Buserelin/Decapeptyl) is initiated in cases where the cycle of stimulation is launched with the woman coming off a BCP or when the agonist is initiated on day 20-23 (the mid luteal phase) of a natural cycle. When this happens it is due to the initial agonist-induced FSH “surge” sometimes so accelerating follicular growth that it leads to the development of one or more “functional follicular cysts”. These cysts release E2 and cause the blood E2 often to remain elevated (>70pg/ml). Depending on the extent of this effect, it sometimes leads to a delay in the onset of menstruation and thus also to deferment in the initiation of COS.

    Failure of menstruation to commence within 4-7 days of initiating treatment with GnRHa suggestive of an underlying “functional ovarian cyst” and calls for an ultrasound examination to make the diagnosis. Once diagnosed, depending upon the number and size of cysts detected. There are two therapeutic options:
    1) Wait for the cyst to absorb spontaneously and for menstruation to ensue: While it at first might seem that this approach of continuing GnRHa therapy in order to cause absorption of the cyst(s) within a week or two might be a good approach , it often has unintended consequences. First there is the real possibility that prolonged uninterrupted GnRHa therapy might blunt subsequent ovarian follicular response to gonadotropin therapy and second, if menstruation does not follow within 10-14 days, the cycle will usually need to be cancelled.
    2) Immediate needle aspiration of the cyst(s) under local anesthesia. I personally favor needle aspiration, sooner rather than later in such cases. Menstruation will usually follow a successful aspiration within 2-4 days. Upon menstruation a blood E2 level is measured and as soon as it drops below 70pg/ml COS can be initiated.

    B. Corpus Luteum cysts: As with follicular cysts, so at times do Corpus Luteum cysts also bleed, distend and cause fain. They often delay onset of spontaneous menstruation by a week or longer (Halban syndrome”.). In isolated cases, internal bleeding within the cyst substance causes pain, rapid enlargement of the lesion and by ultrasound examination reveals local areas of absorption causing it to appear as a “complex” cystic lesion that simulates a tumor, prompting surgical intervention. Sadly, there are countless cases where women have had an entire ovary removed due to this happening.

    “Functional ovarian cysts” rarely present as a serious health hazard. In the vast majority of cases they spontaneously resolve within 2-4 weeks while “cystic tumors” will not. Accordingly, the persistence of any ovarian cyst that persists for longer than 4 weeks should raise suspicion of it being a tumor rather than with a “functional cyst”. Since ovarian tumors can be (or become) malignant, all ovarian cysts that persist for longer than 6 weeks (whether occurring in non-pregnant or pregnant women), should be considered for surgical removal and this should be followed by pathological analysis.

    Good luck!

    Geoff Sher
    PH: 800-780-7437

  • Jenna - July 11, 2016 reply

    Hi Dr Sher, I have a quick question. I am preparing for a FET in a few weeks. I have 4 fresh cycles last year and then in December I developed cysts on my ovaries. They were still there in February and my consultant thought that maybe it was endo of the ovaries (I do not have endo as far as I know) so I had an MRI which confirmed they were not endo but just normal cysts, I had 2 on the left and 1 on the right. I decided to take a few months off to let them heal so we are now preparing for the FET. I have a scan this week to check on the cysts but I think they are still there because I can feel them on and off, it isn’t painful but I am just aware of them. My question is, if they are still there but I get the go ahead, could the cysts interfere with the estrogen tablets? I have a “thinner” lining as it is so I really do not want to do anything that could interfere with my lining. I really look forward to hearing from you and thank you for reading my email 🙂

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - July 11, 2016 reply

    If they are there after a few months, in spite of the MRI showing no ovarian endometriomas , or cystic tumors, I would be unconvinced.

    However, they should not interfere with your FET cycle at all.

    Good luck!

    Geoff sher

  • TIFFANY Warren - May 5, 2016 reply

    Hello,
    I believe you posted about this before, but I cannot locate the post, so I will be brief with my question. Both of my tubes were removed due to endometriosis related issues. Well, I am now 36 yrs old. My husband and I have been trying to conceive for over 8 years now. One failed cycle (immediately after removal of my tubes, I think I should of waited longer then 90 days). Now, I am having issues with how many follicles I am producing. I switched Dr.’s and he has me on lots of different stuff. Metformin, Vitamin D, Calcium, Pregnitude, Prenatal Vitamins, but no DHEA. Anyway, my Dr. has given me 2 day 3 tests so far, and the last time I only had 2 follicles in one ovary and a cyst in the other. He has also now diagnosed me with PCOS. He said something last check about Donor Eggs. I feel like, I do not want to be rushed into this, My insurance is paying basically 95% of everything, but I know all it takes is 1 egg to be successful. I just recently started Acupuncture as well. My question is, when I go for my next day 3 (this weekend) if he suggests donor eggs.. will it be to my best interest to try other alternative first to try to get my follicle count up? ex. eat better, loose weight, more acupuncture etc.? Or due to my age, I need to make a decision asap??

    Please Help..
    P.S. He is very confident in his work.. his words to me were ” He is to IVF/Fertility treatment what Michael Jordan is to basketball”. He feels he is the best, which is good confidence, but sometimes even Michael Jordan made mistakes and lost a few games.

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - May 5, 2016 reply

    It sounds as if you might have diminished ovarian reserve. If so i need to know the extent of this (i.e. your AMH). Thereupon, given that you are only 36y, we could possibly design a protocol that would protect your eggs and yield better quality eggs/embryos.

    You would probably need a modified, robust, long pituitary down-regulation protocol. I would use an agonist/antagonist conversion protocol with human growth hormone (HGH) augmentation and would recommend Staggered IVF with embryo banking of PGS (next generation gene sequencing)-normal blastocysts, to make hay while the sun still shines.

    Please visit my new Blog on this very site, http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com, find the “search bar” and type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly

    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Ovarian Stimulation for IVF using GnRH Antagonists: Comparing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol.(A/ACP) With the“Conventional” Antagonist Aproach
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • The “Biological Clock” and how it should Influence the Selection and Design of Ovarian Stimulation Protocols for IVF.
    • Diagnosing and Treating Infertility due to Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR)
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Why did my IVF Fail
    • Staggered IVF: An Excellent Option When. Advancing Age and Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR) Reduces IVF Success Rate
    • Embryo Banking/Stockpiling: Slows the “Biological Clock” and offers a Selective Alternative to IVF-Egg Donation.
    • Preimplantation Genetic Sampling (PGS) Using: Next Generation Gene Sequencing (NGS): Method of Choice.
    • PGS in IVF: Are Some Chromosomally abnormal Embryos Capable of Resulting in Normal Babies and Being Wrongly Discarded?
    • Traveling for IVF from Out of State/Country–
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • Functional” Ovarian Cysts and IVF
    • Endometriosis and Infertily
    • Treating Ovarian Endometriomas with Sclerotherapy.
    • Implications of “Empty Follicle Syndrome and “Premature Luteinization”
    • Premature Luteinization (“the premature LH surge): Why it happens and how it can be prevented.

    I invite you to arrange to have a Skype or an in-person consultation with me to discuss your case in detail. If you are interested, please contact Julie Dahan, at:

    Email: Julied@sherivf.com

    OR

    Phone: 702-533-2691
    800-780-7437

    I also suggest that you access the 4th edition of my book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies”. It is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoff Sher

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