Dr. Sher Blog

Official blog of Dr. Geoffrey Sher

Pro’s and Con’s of “The Lupron Trigger”

by Dr. Geoffrey Sher on April 3, 2016

Traditionally, IVF egg retrievals are timed for about 36 hours after a 10,000U hCG “trigger”. The hCG hormone thereupon remains in the system for up to a week. When patients who overstimulate following ovarian stimulation experience prolonged exposure to hCG have a risk of developing severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, with its incumbent life-endangering complications. Attempts to mitigate this risk have included:

  1. Withholding the hCG trigger altogether thereby preventing luteinization of follicle granulosa cells and preventing the production of vasoactive substances (e.g. VEGF) which when overproduced escalate the risk/severity of OHSS,
  2. Prematurely administering the hCG trigger to arrest further follicular growth and escalation in blood estradiol levels,
  3. Reducing the dosage of hCG by half, to 5,000U in the hope of limiting/restricting  the luteinization process and,
  4. Supplanting the “hCG trigger’ by an “Agonist (e.g. Lupron) trigger” that causes promotes meiotic egg maturation buy causing a surge in the release of pituitary LH.

All of the options above do indeed reduce the risk of developing OHSS. The first completely prevents egg maturation from occurring and thus virtually precludes the harvesting of “competent” eggs, while numbers two through four all adversely affect  egg “competency” to a degree, thereby compromising both embryo quality and IVF outcome.

Use of the “Lupron trigger” bears further mention: Since its recent introduction, this approach has really gained popularity and caught on in a big way. In truth, there can be little argument that it markedly reduces the incidence, severity and risk of complications associated with severe ovarian hyper stimulation. However, use of the “Lupron trigger” often comes at the expense of egg/embryo quality as well as IVF outcome. Thus, the question arises as to whether this approach is advisable, and if not, what the best alternative to its use would be. The reason why the “Lupron trigger” is in my opinion ill-advised, is that in cases  of ovarian hyper stimulation, where there are numerous follicles with eggs that need to undergo meiosis following the “trigger”, the magnitude of the LH surge, induced by a “Lupron GnRHa trigger” is often insufficient. This can result in suboptimal egg maturation (meiosis), leading to the generation of an inordinate number of immature/dysmature eggs as well as in an increase in the number of large follicles that fail to yield eggs at all (“so called “empty follicles). For this reason, I do not employ the “Lupron trigger” approach in my practice, preferring instead to use the long pituitary down-regulation, along with “prolonged coasting” in women who are deemed to be at risk for developing OHSS.  My position is further supported by a recent publication showing that for this very reason, the use of a GnRHa-induced “trigger is not helpful.

Prolonged Coasting, my preferred choice: My approach is consistently to have my patients who are at risk of developing OHSS, launch their ovarian stimulation, coming off a monophasic birth control pill (BCP). The last few days on the BCP is accompanied by the addition of Lupron. Thereupon the BCP is stopped and Lupron therapy is continued. After 3-7 days menstruation usually ensues, at which point the dosage of Lupron is reduced and low dosage FSHr (Follistim/Gonal-F/Puregon) -dominant ovarian stimulation is commenced. Lupron and gonadotropins are then continued together. This approach is referred to as the  “Long Pituitary Down-regulation protocol.”  Use of the BCP is intended to lower LH and thereby reduce stromal activation (hyperthecosis) in the hope of controlling ovarian androgen (mainly testosterone) release (too much ovarian testosterone is harmful to egg development). Seventy five (75) units of LH/hCG (Luveris/Menopur) are added from the 3rd day of gonadotropin stimulation. Starting on the 7th day of ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins, I start watching daily for the number and size of follicles developing and for the rise in blood [E2].

If there are > 25 follicles, the patient becomes a candidate for “prolonged coasting,” at which point I keep stimulating with gonadotropins (regardless of the [E2]) until:

 a) 50% of all follicles reach 14mm and

b) the [E2] reaches 2500pg/ml.

At that point, gonadotropin stimulation is discontinued abruptly while daily Lupron injections continue. Thereupon, I follow the daily blood [E2] without doing further US examinations. The [E2] will almost invariably continue to rise. I carefully plot the rise in [E2] (regardless of how high it goes). Usually, within 1-3 days it will plateau and then start to decline. As soon as the [E2] drops below 2500pg/ml (and not before then), I administer the 10,000U hCGu (Novarel/Pregnyl/Profasi) “trigger” or 500mcg of hCGr (Ovidrel) and then schedule an egg retrieval for 36h later. ICSI is a MUST because “coasted” eggs usually have few or no surrounding cumulus cells and eggs without a cumulus layer will not readily fertilize on their own. All fertilized eggs are cultured to the blastocyst (up to 6 days) whereupon I transfer up to two into the uterus, or vitrify all expanded blastocysts for subsequent dispensation at the directive of the patient. In some cases the embryos are biopsied for PGS testing prior to being cryostored. Subsequent frozen embryo transfers are conducted as per the wishes of the patients.

It is important to point out that the success of this “prolonged coasting” approach depends on precise timing of the initiation and the conclusion of “prolonged coasting”. If you start too early, follicle growth will stop and the cycle will be lost. If you start too late, you will encounter too many post-mature/cystic follicles (>22mm) that usually harbor abnormally developed eggs.  

Use of the above approach avoids unnecessary cycle cancellation, severe OHSS, and optimizes egg/embryo quality. The worst you might encounter is mild to moderate OHSS, and this too is uncommon.

The use of an agonist or GNRH trigger ,while reducing the risk of severe OHSS developing, comes at the expense of egg/embryo quality and could compromise IVF outcome.

Share this post:

10 comments

Leave A Reply
  • Reeta - February 14, 2017 reply

    I am a Pcod pt and on leupride 10 units down regulation with Gonal 100 units – day 10 of stimulation ( step down from 200 units) . Dr told me that I have high risk for ohss . Can I stop my leupide and change to antagonist protocol and take a leupide trigger to reduce my risk of ohss. ?

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - February 14, 2017 reply

    Ideal egg development sets the scene for optimal egg maturation that occurs 36-42h prior to ovulation or egg retrieval. Without prior optimal egg development (ovogenesis), egg maturation will be dysfunctional and most eggs will be rendered “incompetent” and unable upon fertilization to propagate viable embryos. In IVF, optimal ovogenesis requires the selection and implementation of an individualized approach to controlled ovaria stimulation (COS). Thereupon, at the ideal time, maturational division of the egg’s chromosomes (i.e. meiosis) is “triggered” through the administration of hCG or an agonist such as Lupron, which induces an LH surge. The, dosage and timing of the “trigger shot” profoundly affects the efficiency of meiosis, the potential to yield “competent (euploid) mature (M2) eggs, and as such represents a rate limiting step in the IVF process .

    “Triggering meiosis with Urine-derived hCG (Pregnyl/Profasi/Novarel) versus recombinant hCG (Ovidrel): Until quite recently, the standard method used to “trigger” egg maturation was through the administration of 10,000 units of hCGu. Subsequently,, a DNA recombinant form of hCGr (Ovidrel)was introduced and marketed in 250 mcg doses. But clinical experience strongly suggests that 250 mcg of Ovidrel is most likely not equivalent in biological potency to 10,000 units of hCG. It probably only has 50%-70%of the potency of a 10,000U dose of hCGu and as such might not be sufficient to fully promote meiosis, especially in cases where the woman has numerous follicles. For this reason, I firmly believe that when hCGr is selected as the “trigger shot” the dosage should best be doubled to 500 mcg at which dosage it will probably have an equivalent effect on promoting meiosis as would 10,000 units of hCGu. Failure to “trigger” with 10,000U hCGu or 500mcg hCGr, will in my opinion increase the likelihood of disorderly meiosis, “incompetent (aneuploid) eggs” and the risk of follicles not yielding eggs at egg retrieval (“empty follicles”). Having said this, it is my personal opinion that it is unnecessary to supplant hCGu with hCGr since the latter is considerably more expensive and is probably no more biopotent than the latter.

    Some clinicians, when faced with a risk of OHSS developing will deliberately elect to reduce the dosage of hCG administered as a trigger in the hope that by doing so the risk of critical OHSS developing will be lowered. It is my opinion, that such an approach is not optimal because a low dose of hCG (e.g., 5000 units, hCGu or 25omcg hCGr) is likely inadequate to optimize the efficiency of meiosis particularly when it comes to cases such as this where there are numerous follicles. It has been suggested that the preferential use of an “agonist (Lupron) trigger” in women at risk of developing severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome could potentially reduce the risk of the condition becoming critical and thereby placing the woman at risk of developing life-endangering complications. It is with this in mind that many RE’s prefer to trigger meiosis by way of an “agonist (Lupron) trigger rather than through the use of hCG. The agonist promptly causes the woman’s pituitary gland to expunge a large amount of LH over a short period of time and it is this LH “surge” that triggers meiosis. The problem with using this approach, in my opinion, is that it is hard to predict how much LH will be released in by the pituitary gland. For this reason, I personally prefer to use hCGu for the trigger, even in cases of ovarian hyperstimulation hyperstimulated, with one important proviso…that being that is she underwent “prolonged coasting” in order to reduce the risk of critical OHSS, prior to the 10,000 unit hCGu “ trigger”.

    The timing of the “trigger shot “to initiate meiosis: This should coincide with the majority of ovarian follicles being >15 mm in mean diameter with several follicles having reached 18-22 mm. Follicles of larger than 22 mm will usually harbor overdeveloped eggs which in turn will usually fail to produce good quality eggs. Conversely, follicles less than 15 mm will usually harbor underdeveloped eggs that are more likely to be aneuploid and incompetent following the “trigger”.

    Severe Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is often associated with e poor egg/embryo quality. This is especially so in women with high ovarian LH-induced testosterone (e.g. those with PCOS). The often present with poorly developed (“dysmorphic”) eggs, with reduced fertilization potential and yielding “poor quality embryos”. However, in the author’s opinion (which admittedly runs contrary to popular opinion), this is unlikely to be due to an intrinsic deficit in egg quality. Rather, it more likely relates to intra-ovarian hormonal changes brought about by hyperstimulation and which compromise egg development. This effect, in my opinion, can often be significantly reduced through implementation of an individualized or customized ovarian stimulation protocols that minimize exposure of the developing follicles and eggs to excessive LH-induced ovarian androgens. This can be best achieved by limiting the use of LH-containing gonadotropins such as Menopur through selective institution of “prolonged coasting” (see below). Approaches to preventing OHSS include:
    1. PROLONGED COASTING (My preferred approach) : My approach is to use a long pituitary DR protocol coming off up to 2 months on the BCP, overlapped in the last 3 days with the agonist, Lupron. The BCP is intended to lower LH and thereby reduce stromal activation (hyperthecosis) in the hope of controlling ovarian androgen (predominantly, testosterone) production and release. I then stimulate with low dosage FSHr (Follistim/Gonal-F/Puregon) to which I add a smidgeon of LH/hCG (Luveris/Menopur) from the 3rd day. Then, starting on day 7 of ovarian stimulation, I perform serial blood estradiol (E2) and ultrasound follicle assessments, watching for the # of follicles and [E2]. If there are > 25 follicles, I keep stimulating (regardless of the [E2] until 50% of all follicles reach 14mm. At this point, provided the [E2] reaches at least >2,500pg/ml, I stop the agonist as well as gonadotropin stimulation and track the blood E2 (without continuing US, follicle measurements) ) daily. The [E2] will almost invariably increase for a few days. I watch the E2 rise (regardless of how high a blood concentration it reaches) and then track it coming down again. As soon as the [E2] drops below 2500pg/ml (and not before then), I administer a “trigger” shot of 10,000U hCGu (Profasi/ Novarel/Pregnyl) or hCGr (Ovidrel/Ovitrel-500mcg) and perform an egg retrieval 36 hours later. ICSI is a MUST because “coasted” eggs usually have no cumulus oophoris envelopment and eggs without a cumulus will not readily fertilize naturally. Moreover, they also tend to have a “hardened” envelopment (zona pellucida), making spontaneous fertilization problematic in many cases. All fertilized eggs are cultured to blastocyst (up to 6 days) and are then either vitrified and preserved for subsequent transfer in later hormone replacement cycles or up to two (2) fresh blastocysts are transferred transvaginal under US guidance.. The success of this approach depends on precise timing of the initiation and conclusion of “prolonged coasting”. If you start too early, follicle growth will stop and the cycle will be lost. If you start too late, you will encounter too many post-mature/cystic follicles (>22mm) that usually harbor abnormally developed eggs. Use of “Coasting” avoids unnecessary cycle cancellation, severe OHSS, and optimizes egg/embryo quality. The worst you will encounter is mild to moderate OHSS and this too is uncommon. The obvious remedy for these adverse effects on egg and endometrial development is to employ stimulation protocols that limit ovarian over-exposure to LH and allowing the time necessary for the follicles/eggs to develop optimally, prior to administering hCG through the judicious implementation of “Prolonged coasting” (PC).
    2. MULTIPLE FOLLICLE ASPIRATION: In some cases, where because of mean follicle size exceeding 16mm or when “coasting” fails to effectively lower the [E2} below 2,500pg/ml within 3 days, the number of developing follicles can effectively and drastically reduced through target transvaginal aspiration, 1-3 PRIOR to planned the hCG trigger. This will almost invariably be accompanied by a rapid and significant drop in the plasma [E2] and in the process will drastically reduce reduce the risk of OHSS occurring without significantly compromising egg/embryo quality. The drawback of this effective approach is the fact that it interjects an additional surgical intervention into an already complex and stressful situation. i
    3. TRIGGERING WITH LOW DOISAGE hCG; Because of the fact that hCG augments the development of OHSS (unless preceded by “coasting”), may RE’s prefer to use a lower dosage of hCG for the “trigger. This is either done by administering 5,000U (half the traditional dosage) or by administering, a 250mcg (rather than 500mcg) of DNA recombinant form of hCGr (Ovidrel/Ovitrel. Some clinicians, when faced with a risk of OHSS developing will deliberately elect to reduce the “trigger” dosage of hCG administered (from 10,000U to 5,000U or 250mcg of recombinant hCG-Ovidrel) in the hope that by doing so the risk of critical OHSS developing will be lowered. While this might indeed be true, it is my opinion, that such a reduced dosage is usually insufficient to optimize the efficiency of egg meiosis, e3specially when there are so many follicles present. While the use of a reduced “trigger” dosage of hCG does indeed reduce the risk and occurrence of OHSS-related life-endangering complications, the price to be paid is reduced egg quality/”competency”.
    4. “TRIGGERING” WITH A GnRH AGONIST (E.G. “LUPRON/BUSERELIN): More recently, an increasing number of RE’s prefer to trigger meiosis by way of an agonist (Lupron/Buserelin/Superfact () “trigger” rather than through the use of hCG. The idea is to mimic what happens in natural cycles to promote egg maturation (meiosis) and ovulation, namely to have the agonist cause a “surge” in the release of body’s own pituitary LH to trigger egg meiosis (maturation) .But the amount of LH released in by the pituitary gland is often insufficient to optimize meiotic egg maturation and thus, while this approach also lowers the risk of OHSS it again comes at the expense of egg quality/competency.

    I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.
    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Use of GnRH Antagonists (Ganirelix/Cetrotide/Orgalutron) in IVF-Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas:
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • Preventing Severe Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS) with “Prolonged Coasting.
    • “Triggering” Egg Maturation in IVF: Comparing urine-derived hCG, Recombinant DNA-hCG and GnRH-agonist:
    • The “Lupron Trigger” to Prevent Severe OHSS: What are the Pro’s and Con’s?
    • Email: Julied@sherivf.com
    • Phone: 702-533-2691
     800-780-7437

    Geoff Sher

    I also suggest that you access the 4th edition of my book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies”. It is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Colleen - November 3, 2017 reply

    I am 41 it’s my first IVF cycle. I took menopur and gonal f high doses and certitude in morn. I am someone who has follicles growing early on so this cycle started on day two of menses and has been going now for 14 days a long cycle. Slow start but lots popped up I have 19 follicles . I know you don’t like lupron but it looks like I will get triggered with lupron tomorrow night not sure if that is with Hcg or not ? Any thoughts . But try to stay positive 🙂 thank you Dr Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - November 3, 2017 reply

    I really cannot comment beyond what I have already expressed (and you know) about the “Lpron trigger”.

    Good luck!

    Geoff Sher

    Colleen McNamara - November 3, 2017 reply

    Yes I am from Long Island. 8th grade english teacher. I have your book. I know your “the man” so to speak. Not sure how how my doc (trivax) could have troubleshot for me being potential OHS candidate..as I did three IUIs this summer did not make me produce a ton.Also, I am older my AMH is .86 but i dont have PCOS so how would you predict a 19 follicle response. I am at end of the protocol now so if you dont think LUPRON is effective in bringing about proper meiotic division….what could he do at this point? trigger is tomorrow night for Monday retrieval… ? Do people really die from OHHS.I dont feel terribly bloated right now….what if he just triggered me with regular full dose of HCG and took the risk…?? if that too risky can you do half HCG shot Half lupron? what would you do ?

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - November 4, 2017

    In my opinion, with an AMH of 0.86 and 19 follicles you are not a candidate for OHSS. I cannot insert myself into your treatment. All I can say is that for a patient of mine, given these parameters (if accurate), I would trigger with 10,000U hCG or 500mcg of Ovidrel.

    Geoff Sher

  • Pat - May 17, 2016 reply

    Thank you for your response and recommended articles. Any articles on how soon before the retrieval of eggs on a Ivf or how Many cycles should you be taking bcp. I started them on day three 3 days ago and according to the nurse FET will occur in September. As much as I wanted the transfer to be in August she said they do not have a date in June for retrieval. I will also have them go thru a PGS and according to her this take about a month to get results…I feel taking BCP now is to far apart… thank you

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - May 17, 2016 reply

    It really does not matter if you take the bCP for longer. However, if you launch a fresh cycle coming off a BCP, then in my opinion, you should overlap with an agonist such as Lupron or Buserelin.

    One often hears the expressed opinion that the BCP suppresses response to ovarian stimulation. This is not the case, provided that the BCP is overlapped with administration of an agonist (e.g. Lupron, Buserelin, Superfact) for several days leading up to the start of menstruation and the initiation of ovarian stimulation cycle with gonadotropin drugs. If the latter precaution is not taken, and the cycle of stimulation is initiated coming directly off the BCP the response will often be blunted and subsequent egg quality could be adversely affected.
    The explanation for this is that in natural (unstimulated) as well as in cycles stimulated with fertility drugs, the ability of follicles to properly respond to FSH stimulation is dependent on their having developed FSH-responsive receptors . Pre-antral follicles (PAF) do not have such primed FSH receptors and thus cannot respond properly to FSH stimulation with gonadotropins. The acquisition of FSH receptor responsivity requires that the pre-antral follicles be exposed to FSH, for a number of days (5-7) during which time they attain “FSH-responsivity” and are now known as antral follicles (AF). These AF’s are now able to respond properly to stimulation with administered FSH-gonadotropins. In regular menstrual cycles, the rising FSH output from the pituitary gland insures that PAPs convert tor AF’s. The BCP (as well as prolonged administration of estrogen/progesterone) suppresses FSH. This suppression needs to be countered by artificially causing blood FSH levels to rise in order to cause PAF to AF conversion prior to COS commencing, otherwise pre-antral-to –antral follicle conversion will not take place in an orderly fashion and the follicles will not readily respond to gonadotropins (FSH) , thereby delaying follicle development by up to 7 days and compromising egg quality. GnRH agonists (e.g. Lupron, Buserelin, Superfact) , cause an immediate surge in release of FSH by the pituitary gland thus causing conversion from PAF to SAF. This is why, women who take a BCP to launch a cycle of COS need to have an overlap of the BCP with an agonist.
    By overlapping the BCP with an agonist for a few days prior to menstruation the early recruited follicles are able to complete their developmental drive to the AF stage and as such, be ready to respond appropriately to optimal ovarian stimulation. Using this approach, the timing of the initiation of the IVF treatment cycle can readily and safely be regulated and controlled by varying the length of time that the woman is on the BCP.

    Please call or email Julie Dahan, my patient concierge. She will guide you on how to set up an in-person or Skype consultation with me. You can reach Julie at on her cell phone or via email at any time:
    Julie Dahan
    • Email: Julied@sherivf.com
    • Phone: 702-533-2691
     800-780-7437

    Geoff Sher

    I also suggest that you access the 4th edition of my book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies”. It is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

  • Vanee Pho - April 10, 2016 reply

    Hi Dr Sher, I’ve learned so much from your blog these last few days. I”m 42, AMH at 1.23, had 14 follicles at the start of the microdose lupron protocol (2o units lupron, menopur, 225 follistim). Of those 14, 7 follicles were growing. two days before the trigger, follicle sizes were 19,19, 16, 15, 14, 6, 6. After retrieval I was devastated to find out only one egg was retrieved. Dr Z mentioned that the other follicles did not contain eggs. I see from reading your blog that these eggs may not have been mature.

    Our next step is wait for my menses to start twice (effectively taking 6 weeks off) and then moving on to an antagonist protocol with ganirelix. I think it would entail NOT using birth control pills to suppress the ovaries, but to let follicles grow naturally add further stimulation then the antagonist.

    Could you please kindly comment on what happened in my first retrieval? were the eggs suppressed too much by BCP and lupron?

    Is there any way to figure out that these follicles did NOT have manture eggs? My estrodiol levels were rising as exected.

    Can you comment on this new protocol I’ll be doing for my second retrieval? This will be our last shot at it as donor eggs will be out of the question at this point.

    thank you so much Dr Sher!

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - April 11, 2016 reply

    In my opinion, “microdose” (“flare”) Lupron protocols, the use of clomiphene or Letrozole, and high dosage Menopur protocols, should best not be used in older women or in women with DOR (see below). It surges LH and with it ovarian testosterone as the stimulation begins and this can have a deleterious effect on egg quality/competency…especially in older women such as yourself. You need a modified, long pituitary down-regulation protocol. I would use an agonist/antagonist conversion protocol with human growth hormone (HGH) augmentation and would recommend Staggered IVF with embryo banking of PGS (next generation gene sequencing)-normal blastocysts, to make hay while the sun still shines.
    Please visit my new Blog on this very site, http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com, find the “search bar” and type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly

    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • Ovarian Stimulation for IVF using GnRH Antagonists: Comparing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol.(A/ACP) With the“Conventional” Antagonist Aproach
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • The “Biological Clock” and how it should Influence the Selection and Design of Ovarian Stimulation Protocols for IVF.
    • Diagnosing and Treating Infertility due to Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR)
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET): A Rational Approach to Hormonal Preparation and How new Methodology is Impacting IVF.
    • Staggered IVF: An Excellent Option When. Advancing Age and Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR) Reduces IVF Success Rate
    • Embryo Banking/Stockpiling: Slows the “Biological Clock” and offers a Selective Alternative to IVF-Egg Donation.
    • Preimplantation Genetic Sampling (PGS) Using: Next Generation Gene Sequencing (NGS): Method of Choice.
    • IVF Failure and Implantation Dysfunction: The Role of Endometrial Thickness, Uterine Pathology and Immunologic Factors
    • Implications of “Empty Follicle Syndrome and “Premature Luteinization”
    • Premature Luteinization (“the premature LH surge): Why it Happens and how it can be Prevented.
    I invite you to call 702-699-7437 or 800-780-7437 or go online on this site and set up a one hour Skype consultation with me to discuss your case in detail.

    I also suggest that you access the 4th edition of my book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies”. It is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoff Sher

Ask a question or post a comment