Dr. Sher Blog

Official blog of Dr. Geoffrey Sher

Unexplained IVF Failure

by Dr. Geoffrey Sher on May 10, 2017

IVF treatment always exacts a profound emotional and financial toll on patients/couples. Needless to say, the financial burden is often crippling; however, ask any woman who has undergone IVF, and she will likely tell you that the emotional impact was by far the most devastating….especially when the IVF treatment cycle failed to bring her a baby.

Even in the most capable medical hands and treating the easiest cases, the transfer of up to two advanced embryos (blastocysts) will at best yield a  40%-45%% chance of a live birth after a single attempt . After 2 fresh embryo transfers plus as many frozen embryo transfers (FET) as available left-over blastocysts will allow, the comparable success rate can approach 80%. This is why when a viable pregnancy fails to happen, the question of why it failed, will invariably arise. It is always incumbent upon the treating physician to carefully evaluate for a possible remediable cause, before trying again.

Currently, more than 70% of the IVF patients I treat have had at least 2 prior failed attempts before consulting with me and well over 50% have failed IVF at least 3 times prior to seeking my services. I could cite many cases where patients have even endured as many as 10 or more prior IVF failures or losses after miscarriages. But there is one case in particular that is permanently embedded in my memory and which highlights the importance of an individualized approach to treating infertility patients, especially when it comes to those with prior IVF failures.

The patient was a 42 year old physician who hailed from Australia. She had endured 23 prior unsuccessful embryo transfers over a period of more than a decade. By the time I got to know her she had developed severely diminished ovarian reserve (her day 3 FSH was 26MIU/ml). After a lengthy telephone consultation with me, I urged her to send a blood sample from Melbourne, Australia to a reputable Reproductive Immunology Reference Laboratory in Southern California for testing, to screen for immunologic implantation dysfunction (IID). It soon became apparent that she had an autoimmune thyroid condition (antithyroid antibodies) plus activation of uterine Natural Killer Cells (NKa+). After putting her on an aggressive agonist/antagonist conversion protocol (A/ACP) with estrogen priming and treating her with selective immunotherapy, I harvested (just) three eggs and subsequently transferred two embryos to her uterus. She conceived on this cycle and gave birth to a very healthy baby boy nine months later.

So then…what are the most common reasons for “unexplained” IVF failure, and what can be done to deal with them?

To adequately address these two all-important questions, we first need to recognize and understand that with the exception of poor technical skill in performing embryo transfer (ET), IVF failure is virtually always due to one of the following two causes, which I will address below:

  1. Embryo “Incompetence” (about 80%)
  2. Dysfunctional/failed embryo implantation (about 20%)

Embryo Incompetence:

What is critical to understand here is that it is the chromosomal integrity (“competence”) of the embryo that is the main determinant of its ability to propagate a normal pregnancy.  It is almost always the egg (rather than the sperm) that determines this factor. Only a mature egg (MII) that is numerically chromosomally normal with 23 chromosomes (i.e. euploid) at the time of egg retrieval can propagate a “competent” embryo.  No manipulation in the IVF laboratory, can cause an egg that has an irregular quota of chromosomes (aneuploid) to propagate a competent/euploid embryo (i.e. 46 chromosomes). Patients should be highly skeptical of any suggestion to the contrary. Simply stated, an embryology laboratory can only grow competent embryos from competent eggs.

Thus, egg competency at the time of egg retrieval will ultimately determine the ability to generate competent embryos for embryo transfer.  By the time the egg is extracted, the “die has been cast” What this means is that aside from the woman’s age – which influences the percentage of her eggs that will have the potential to develop into euploid mature (MII) eggs following hormonal stimulation – the only manner by which we as IVF physicians can influence egg quality is by applying an individualized approach to ovarian stimulation. Without such an approach, egg development will often be compromised (especially in older women, in those with PCOS, and in women with DOR). The subsequent implementation of the “trigger shot” would thereupon be much more likely to cause disorderly rearrangement of egg chromosomes, leading to a greater likelihood of egg /embryo aneuploidy.

Today, through the use of full embryo chromosomal. preimplantation genetic screening-(PGS) we can identify “competent”, euploid embryos for selective transfer. The use of this technique is both diagnostic (in that it allows us to determine whether the cause of IVF failure is embryo incompetence or an implantation issue) and therapeutic (in that we can thereupon selectively transfer up to two embryos at a time and achieve better than a 60% pregnancy rate while keeping the early miscarriage rate well below 10% and virtually eliminating the chance of high-order multiples (triplets or greater). PGS embryo selection is of special relevance and value in cases of older women or those with DOR for whom “Staggered IVF” with embryo banking is of particular value (see elsewhere on this blog).

Dysfunctional or Failed Implantation

Endometrial thickness: We previously have published that an ideal endometrium measures at least 8mm (and preferably >9mm) in thickness at the time of maximal estrogen stimulation and that failure to achieve this goal, commonly leads to failed implantation. We subsequently reported on the fact that in many such cases, if appropriately administered prior to egg retrieval and/or before the initiation of progesterone therapy, vaginal sildenafil (Viagra) by improving uterine blood flow can within 48-72 hours cause a significant improvement in endometrial growth.

Uterine surface lesions: We have also pointed to the importance of excluding the existence of surface lesions that protrude into the uterine cavity (polyps, fibroid tumors or scarring) as they can, by creating an adverse uterine environment, lead to failed implantation. Only a hysteroscopy or a sonohysterogram (saline ultrasound) can diagnose the latter which needs to be treated surgically before embarking on IVF. A dye-X-ray or hysterosalpingogram (HSG) is too inaccurate to accomplish this.

Immunologic factors: Then there is the ever-important (albeit commonly overlooked) issue of immunologic implantation dysfunction (IID) that should always be looked for and addressed in cases of unexplained or repeated IVF failure. Frankly, since IID will rarely occur in the absence of uterine natural killer cell activation (NKa) and most of my IVF patients come to see me because of unexplained prior repeat failures in I test almost everyone initially for Nka. If the test result comes back positive, I expand immunologic testing to look for the underlying cause. This having been said, since selective immunotherapy with intralipid (IL)/steroids/ Lovenox is so often successful in reversing the IID it is in my opinion important to always have a high index of suspicion regarding the possibility that IVF failure could be due to IID.

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  • Teresa - October 15, 2017 reply

    Dr. Sher,
    I am 35 & have had 5 failed IVF (3 fresh, 2 frozen) all chemicals with slow rising beta hcg #s. (I also had this experience with 2 IUIs.) I have 3 frozen embryos & am currently awaiting PGS results, which I had not done on the prior embryos. My dr has suggested an ERA. She has not mentioned any of the immunological tests. I’ve read through your site & see you are a proponent of the latter but not the former. I’d appreciate any insights before I speak with my dr again, hopefully the PGS results will be in soon.

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - October 16, 2017 reply

    When it comes to reproduction, humans are the poorest performers of all mammals. In fact we are so inefficient that up to 75% of fertilized eggs do not produce live births, and up to 30% of pregnancies end up being lost within 10 weeks of conception (in the first trimester). RPL is defined as two (2) or more failed pregnancies. Less than 5% of women will experience two (2) consecutive miscarriages, and only 1% experience three or more.
    Pregnancy loss can be classified by the stage of pregnancy when the loss occurs:
    • Early pregnancy loss (first trimester)
    • Late pregnancy loss (after the first trimester)
    • Occult “hidden” and not clinically recognized, (chemical) pregnancy loss (occurs prior to ultrasound confirmation of pregnancy)
    • Early pregnancy losses usually occur sporadically (are not repetitive).
    In more than 70% of cases the loss is due to embryo aneuploidy (where there are more or less than the normal quota of 46 chromosomes). Conversely, repeated losses (RPL), with isolated exceptions where the cause is structural (e.g., unbalanced translocations), are seldom attributable to numerical chromosomal abnormalities (aneuploidy). In fact, the vast majority of cases of RPL are attributable to non-chromosomal causes such as anatomical uterine abnormalities or Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID).
    Since most sporadic early pregnancy losses are induced by chromosomal factors and thus are non-repetitive, having had a single miscarriage the likelihood of a second one occurring is no greater than average. However, once having had two losses the chance of a third one occurring is double (35-40%) and after having had three losses the chance of a fourth miscarriage increases to about 60%. The reason for this is that the more miscarriages a woman has, the greater is the likelihood of this being due to a non-chromosomal (repetitive) cause such as IID. It follows that if numerical chromosomal analysis (karyotyping) of embryonic/fetal products derived from a miscarriage tests karyotypically normal, then by a process of elimination, there would be a strong likelihood of a miscarriage repeating in subsequent pregnancies and one would not have to wait for the disaster to recur before taking action. This is precisely why we strongly advocate that all miscarriage specimens be karyotyped.
    There is however one caveat to be taken into consideration. That is that the laboratory performing the karyotyping might unwittingly be testing the mother’s cells rather than that of the conceptus. That is why it is not possible to confidently exclude aneuploidy in cases where karyotyping of products suggests a “chromosomally normal” (euploid) female.
    Late pregnancy losses (occurring after completion of the 1st trimester/12th week) occur far less frequently (1%) than early pregnancy losses. They are most commonly due to anatomical abnormalities of the uterus and/or cervix. Weakness of the neck of the cervix rendering it able to act as an effective valve that retains the pregnancy (i.e., cervical incompetence) is in fact one of the commonest causes of late pregnancy loss. So also are developmental (congenital) abnormalities of the uterus (e.g., a uterine septum) and uterine fibroid tumors. In some cases intrauterine growth retardation, premature separation of the placenta (placental abruption), premature rupture of the membranes and premature labor can also causes of late pregnancy loss.
    Much progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in RPL. There are two broad categories:
    1. Problems involving the uterine environment in which a normal embryo is prohibited from properly implanting and developing. Possible causes include:
    • Inadequate thickening of the uterine lining
    • Irregularity in the contour of the uterine cavity (polyps, fibroid tumors in the uterine wall, intra-uterine scarring and adenomyosis)
    • Hormonal imbalances (progesterone deficiency or luteal phase defects). This most commonly results in occult RPL.
    • Deficient blood flow to the uterine lining (thin uterine lining).
    • Immunologic implantation dysfunction (IID). A major cause of RPL. Plays a role in 75% of cases where chromosomally normal preimplantation embryos fail to implant.
    • Interference of blood supply to the developing conceptus can occur due to a hereditary clotting disorder known as Thrombophilia.
    2. Genetic and/or structural chromosomal abnormality of the embryo.Genetic abnormalities are rare causes of RPL. Structural chromosomal abnormalities are slightly more common but are also occur infrequently (1%). These are referred to as unbalanced translocation and they result from part of one chromosome detaching and then fusing with another chromosome. Additionally, a number of studies suggest the existence of paternal (sperm derived) effect on human embryo quality and pregnancy outcome that are not reflected as a chromosomal abnormality. Damaged sperm DNA can have a negative impact on fetal development and present clinically as occult or early clinical miscarriage. The Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA) which measures the same endpoints are newer and possibly improved methods for evaluating.

    IMMUNOLOGIC IMPLANTATION DYSFUNCTION
    Autoimmune IID: Here an immunologic reaction is produced by the individual to his/her body’s own cellular components. The most common antibodies that form in such situations are APA and antithyroid antibodies (ATA).
    But it is only when specialized immune cells in the uterine lining, known as cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells, become activated and start to release an excessive/disproportionate amount of TH-1 cytokines that attack the root system of the embryo, that implantation potential is jeopardized. Diagnosis of such activation requires highly specialized blood test for cytokine activity that can only be performed by a handful of reproductive immunology reference laboratories in the United States.
    Alloimmune IID, i.e., where antibodies are formed against antigens derived from another member of the same species, is believed to be a relatively common immunologic cause of recurrent pregnancy loss.
    Autoimmune IID is often genetically transmitted. Thus it should not be surprising to learn that it is more likely to exist in women who have a family (or personal) history of primary autoimmune diseases such as lupus erythematosus (LE), scleroderma or autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Grave’s disease), rheumatoid arthritis, etc. Reactionary (secondary) autoimmunity can occur in conjunction with any medical condition associated with widespread tissue damage. One such gynecologic condition is endometriosis. Since autoimmune IID is usually associated with activated NK and T-cells from the outset, it usually results in such very early destruction of the embryo’s root system that the patient does not even recognize that she is pregnant. Accordingly the condition usually presents as “unexplained infertility” or “unexplained IVF failure” rather than as a miscarriage.

    Alloimmune IID, on the other hand, usually starts off presenting as unexplained miscarriages (often manifesting as RPL). Over time as NK/T cell activation builds and eventually becomes permanently established the patient often goes from RPL to “infertility” due to failed implantation. RPL is more commonly the consequence of alloimmune rather than autoimmune implantation dysfunction.
    However, regardless, of whether miscarriage is due to autoimmune or alloimmune implantation dysfunction the final blow to the pregnancy is the result of activated NK cells and CTL in the uterine lining that damage the developing embryo’s “root system” (trophoblast) so that it can no longer sustain the growing conceptus. This having been said, it is important to note that autoimmune IID is readily amenable to reversal through timely, appropriately administered, selective immunotherapy, and alloimmune IID is not. It is much more difficult to treat successfully, even with the use of immunotherapy. In fact, in some cases the only solution will be to revert to selective immunotherapy plus using donor sperm (provided there is no “match” between the donor’s DQa profile and that of the female recipient) or alternatively to resort to gestational surrogacy.
    DIAGNOSING THE CAUSE OF RPL
    In the past, women who miscarried were not evaluated thoroughly until they had lost several pregnancies in a row. This was because sporadic miscarriages are most commonly the result of embryo numerical chromosomal irregularities (aneuploidy) and thus not treatable. However, a consecutive series of miscarriages points to a repetitive cause that is non-chromosomal and is potentially remediable. Since RPL is most commonly due to a uterine pathology or immunologic causes that are potentially treatable, it follows that early chromosomal evaluation of products of conception could point to a potentially treatable situation. Thus I strongly recommend that such testing be done in most cases of miscarriage. Doing so will avoid a great deal of unnecessary heartache for many patients.
    Establishing the correct diagnosis is the first step toward determining effective treatment for couples with RPL. It results from a problem within the pregnancy itself or within the uterine environment where the pregnancy implants and grows. Diagnostic tests useful in identifying individuals at greater risk for a problem within the pregnancy itself include:

    • Karyotyping (chromosome analysis) both prospective parents
    • Assessment of the karyotype of products of conception derived from previous miscarriage specimens
    • Ultrasound examination of the uterine cavity after sterile water is injected or sonohysterogram, fluid ultrasound, etc.)
    • Hysterosalpingogram (dye X-ray test)
    • Hysteroscopic evaluation of the uterine cavity
    • Full hormonal evaluation (estrogen, progesterone, adrenal steroid hormones, thyroid hormones, FSH/LH, etc.)
    • Immunologic testing to include:
    a) Antiphospholipid antibody (APA) panel
    b) Antinuclear antibody (ANA) panel
    c) Antithyroid antibody panel (i.e., antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies)
    d) Reproductive immunophenotype
    e) Natural killer cell activity (NKa) assay (i.e., K562 target cell test)
    f) Alloimmune testing of both the male and female partners
    TREATMENT OF RPL
    Treatment for Anatomic Abnormalities of the Uterus: This involves restoration through removal of local lesions such as fibroids, scar tissue, and endometrial polyps or timely insertion of a cervical cerclage (a stitch placed around the neck of the weakened cervix) or the excision of a uterine septum when indicated.
    Treatment of Thin Uterine Lining: A thin uterine lining has been shown to correlate with compromised pregnancy outcome. Often this will be associated with reduced blood flow to the endometrium. Such decreased blood flow to the uterus can be improved through treatment with sildenafil and possibly aspirin.
    Sildenafil (Viagra) Therapy. Viagra has been used successfully to increase uterine blood flow. However, to be effective it must be administered starting as soon as the period stops up until the day of ovulation and it must be administered vaginally (not orally). Viagra in the form of vaginal suppositories given in the dosage of 25 mg four times a day has been shown to increase uterine blood flow as well as thickness of the uterine lining. To date, we have seen significant improvement of the thickness of the uterine lining in about 70% of women treated. Successful pregnancy resulted in 42% of women who responded to the Viagra. It should be remembered that most of these women had previously experienced repeated IVF failures.

    Use of Aspirin: This is an anti-prostaglandin that improves blood flow to the endometrium. It is administered at a dosage of 81 mg orally, daily from the beginning of the cycle until ovulation.
    Treating Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction with Selective Immunotherapy: Modalities such as IL/IVIg, heparinoids (Lovenox/Clexane), and corticosteroids (dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone) can be used in select cases depending on autoimmune or alloimmune dysfunction.
    The Use of IVF in the Treatment of RPL
    In the following circumstances, IVF is the preferred option:
    1. When in addition to a history of RPL, another standard indication for IVF (e.g., tubal factor, endometriosis, and male factor infertility) is superimposed.
    2. In cases where selective immunotherapy is needed to treat an immunologic implantation dysfunction.
    The reason for IVF being a preferred approach in such cases is that in order to be effective, the immunotherapy needs to be initiated well before spontaneous or induced ovulation. Given the fact that the anticipated birthrate per cycle of COS with or without IUI is at best about 15%, it follows that short of IVF, to have even a reasonable chance of a live birth, most women with immunologic causes of RPL would need to undergo immunotherapy repeatedly, over consecutive cycles. Conversely, with IVF, the chance of a successful outcome in a single cycle of treatment is several times greater and, because of the attenuated and concentrated time period required for treatment, IVF is far safer and thus represents a more practicable alternative
    Since embryo aneuploidy is a common cause of miscarriage, the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), with tests such as CGH, can provide a valuable diagnostic and therapeutic advantage in cases of RPL. PGD requires IVF to provide access to embryos for testing.
    There are a few cases of intractable alloimmune dysfunction due to absolute DQ alpha matching where Gestational Surrogacy or use of donor sperm could represent the only viable recourse, other than abandoning treatment altogether and/or resorting to adoption. Other non-immunologic factors such as an intractably thin uterine lining or severe uterine pathology might also warrant that last resort consideration be given to gestational surrogacy.
    The good news is that if a couple with RPL is open to all of the diagnostic and treatment options referred to above, a live birthrate of 70%–80% is ultimately achievable.

    I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.
    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Ovarian Stimulation for IVF using GnRH Antagonists: Comparing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion Protocol.(A/ACP) With the “Conventional” Antagonist Approach
    • Ovarian Stimulation in Women Who have Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR): Introducing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion protocol
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Blastocyst Embryo Transfers Should be the Standard of Care in IVF
    • IVF: How Many Attempts should be considered before Stopping?
    • “Unexplained” Infertility: Often a matter of the Diagnosis Being Overlooked!
    • IVF Failure and Implantation Dysfunction:
    • The Role of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 1-Background
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 2- Making a Diagnosis
    • Immunologic Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 3-Treatment
    • Thyroid autoantibodies and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction: Importance of Meticulous Evaluation and Strategic Management:(Case Report
    • Intralipid and IVIG therapy: Understanding the Basis for its use in the Treatment of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Intralipid (IL) Administration in IVF: It’s Composition; How it Works; Administration; Side-effects; Reactions and Precautions
    • Natural Killer Cell Activation (NKa) and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction in IVF: The Controversy!
    • Endometrial Thickness, Uterine Pathology and Immunologic Factors
    • Vaginally Administered Viagra is Often a Highly Effective Treatment to Help Thicken a Thin Uterine Lining
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas:
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • How Many Embryos should be transferred: A Critical Decision in IVF.
    • The Role of Nutritional Supplements in Preparing for IVF

    If you are interested in seeking my advice or services, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com .

    *FYI
    The 4th edition of my newest book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoffrey Sher MD

  • Marcy - September 14, 2017 reply

    Hello Dr. Sher and thank you for providing such valuable resources and information on your site! I found this very helpful after just having an unsuccessful FET.

    I’m 37 and have PCOS. We did 5 rounds of OI where I ovulated fine but no pregnancy then tried IVF. I produced 30 eggs and 23 retrieved w/all fertilizing however 22 of them were abnormal so we were left with only one “normal” embryo to transfer which didn’t implant.

    We were tested for balanced translocation which came back negative for both of us. So I wondered, what would be the most likely cause of this happening if we are chromosomally normal? My age? Perhaps a secondary issue such as the Immunologic factors? My doctor said that my lining was perfect (wasn’t given a specific thickness) and he also said the transfer procedure went perfectly. Could it still be a chromosomal issue with that embryo even though our testing came back good?

    Also, you mentioned trigger shot prior to transfer ..we only did one for retrieval – our FET was 3 months later, no trigger. Should I be concerned about that?

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - September 14, 2017 reply

    Thank you for your kind comments Marcy,

    The problem could be both issues and both should be investigated an addressed before you try again.

    As far as the PCOS is concerned:Let me start by saying that there is no doubt that PCOS exacts a toll on egg quality. This having been said, the egg quality can in large part protected through the judicious implementation of an individualized protocol for ovarian stimulation.
    Women with PCOS are hypersensitive to gonadotropin stimulation and are often at risk of developing serious complications associated with severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Concern for this occurring often leads the treating physician to take precautionary measures aimed at slowing down or stopping hyperstimulation. Such measures include:
    1. Cutting the stimulation short to prevent the E2 from rising too high. Unfortunately this often results in the eggs being underdeveloped at the time of the “trigger” and thus, far more likely to end up being “immature”., “dysmature” and “incompetent”.
    2. Administering a lower “trigger dosage” of hCG , supplanting it (partially or completely) with an Agonist trigger (e.g. Lupron/Buserelin/aminopeptidyl/Superfact). While such measures can certainly reduce the risk/severity of OHSS, it often comes at the expense of egg competency (see below).
    In my opinion, another error of commission during ovarian stimulation of women with PCOS is the indiscriminate use of drugs that either elicit an exaggerated ovarian LH-induced testosterone response (e.g. clomiphene or Letrozole), or provide too much LH (e.g. Menopur/Menogon). Too much ovarian testosterone is harmful to egg development and thus prejudicial to embryo quality/competency.
    In my opinion the best way to approach ovarian stimulation for IVF in women with PCOS, is through the use of a low dosage, FSH-dominant Long ovarian down-regulation protocol, done in readiness for “prolonged coasting” (see below) and “triggering” egg maturation with a full 10,00U dosage of hCG or (no less than) 500mcg of recombinant hCG (Ovidrel)….see below is If this is implemented appropriately, with proper timing, egg/embryo quality can be optimized.

    I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.
    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Use of GnRH Antagonists (Ganirelix/Cetrotide/Orgalutron) in IVF-Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Egg Maturation in IVF: How Egg “Immaturity”, “Post-maturity” and “Dysmaturity” Influence IVF Outcome:
    • Commonly Asked Question in IVF: “Why Did so Few of my Eggs Fertilize and, so Many Fail to Reach Blastocyst?”
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Taking A Fresh Look at Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS), its Presentation, Prevention and Management
    • Preventing Severe Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS) with “Prolonged Coasting”
    • Understanding Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) and the Need to Customize Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • “Triggering” Egg Maturation in IVF: Comparing urine-derived hCG, Recombinant DNA-hCG and GnRH-agonist:
    • The “Lupron Trigger” to Prevent Severe OHSS: What are the Pro’s and Con’s?
    • My Retirement in the Year Ahead: A letter of Thanks From me to You!

    If you are interested in seeking my advice or services, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com .

    *FYI
    The 4th edition of my newest book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Marcy - September 14, 2017 reply

    Thank you so much!

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - September 15, 2017 reply

    You are very welcome Marcy!

    Geoff Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - September 14, 2017 reply

    It could well be both the PCOS as well as an implantation dysfunction. We should talk because both need to be assessed and addressed before you try again.

    Let me start by saying that there is no doubt that PCOS exacts a toll on egg quality. This having been said, the egg quality can in large part protected through the judicious implementation of an individualized protocol for ovarian stimulation.
    Women with PCOS are hypersensitive to gonadotropin stimulation and are often at risk of developing serious complications associated with severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Concern for this occurring often leads the treating physician to take precautionary measures aimed at slowing down or stopping hyperstimulation. Such measures include:
    1. Cutting the stimulation short to prevent the E2 from rising too high. Unfortunately this often results in the eggs being underdeveloped at the time of the “trigger” and thus, far more likely to end up being “immature”., “dysmature” and “incompetent”.
    2. Administering a lower “trigger dosage” of hCG , supplanting it (partially or completely) with an Agonist trigger (e.g. Lupron/Buserelin/aminopeptidyl/Superfact). While such measures can certainly reduce the risk/severity of OHSS, it often comes at the expense of egg competency (see below).
    In my opinion, another error of commission during ovarian stimulation of women with PCOS is the indiscriminate use of drugs that either elicit an exaggerated ovarian LH-induced testosterone response (e.g. clomiphene or Letrozole), or provide too much LH (e.g. Menopur/Menogon). Too much ovarian testosterone is harmful to egg development and thus prejudicial to embryo quality/competency.
    In my opinion the best way to approach ovarian stimulation for IVF in women with PCOS, is through the use of a low dosage, FSH-dominant Long ovarian down-regulation protocol, done in readiness for “prolonged coasting” (see below) and “triggering” egg maturation with a full 10,00U dosage of hCG or (no less than) 500mcg of recombinant hCG (Ovidrel)….see below is If this is implemented appropriately, with proper timing, egg/embryo quality can be optimized.

    I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.
    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Use of GnRH Antagonists (Ganirelix/Cetrotide/Orgalutron) in IVF-Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Egg Maturation in IVF: How Egg “Immaturity”, “Post-maturity” and “Dysmaturity” Influence IVF Outcome:
    • Commonly Asked Question in IVF: “Why Did so Few of my Eggs Fertilize and, so Many Fail to Reach Blastocyst?”
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Taking A Fresh Look at Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS), its Presentation, Prevention and Management
    • Preventing Severe Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS) with “Prolonged Coasting”
    • Understanding Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) and the Need to Customize Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • “Triggering” Egg Maturation in IVF: Comparing urine-derived hCG, Recombinant DNA-hCG and GnRH-agonist:
    • The “Lupron Trigger” to Prevent Severe OHSS: What are the Pro’s and Con’s?
    • My Retirement in the Year Ahead: A letter of Thanks From me to You!

    If you are interested in seeking my advice or services, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com .

    *FYI
    The 4th edition of my newest book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Marcy - September 14, 2017 reply

    Also wanted to mention that I’ve had a hysterosalpingogram which came back normal (aside from showing that my uterus is somewhat tilted)

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - September 15, 2017 reply

    Copy!

    Geoff Sher

  • Billie - September 7, 2017 reply

    Hi Dr. Sher,

    I’m 35 now and had 2 failed frozen IVF cycles, both with day 5 blasts AA quality, one ended up a chemical and the other ones didn’t implant. After reading your site I’m wondering if that’s my problem. Would be grate if you could advice me on the following –

    1) Is there a way to reduce chromosome abnormal eggs bring produced? (PGS is prohibited in my country)
    2) I was pregnant once in my early 20’s but I had to have an abortion that time. I don’t know if that affect anything in my womb after a decade. But in the two IVF cycles, my doctor says my womb looks good and my lining were great and it’s around 11-12mm thick. With such background will that elimate the possibility of implantation dysfunction for me?

    Look forward to your reply soon, thanks for your help.

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - September 7, 2017 reply

    1) Is there a way to reduce chromosome abnormal eggs bring produced? (PGS is prohibited in my country).

    A: Probably not but the use the ideal stimulation protocol can help protect those eggs that are capable of developing normally (see below).

    2) I was pregnant once in my early 20’s but I had to have an abortion that time. I don’t know if that affect anything in my womb after a decade. But in the two IVF cycles, my doctor says my womb looks good and my lining were great and it’s around 11-12mm thick. With such background will that elimate the possibility of implantation dysfunction for me?

    A: It does not rule out an implantation dysfunction.

    Whenever a patient fails to achieve a viable pregnancy following embryo transfer (ET), the first question asked is why! Was it simply due to, bad luck?, How likely is the failure to recur in future attempts and what can be done differently, to avoid it happening next time?.
    It is an indisputable fact that any IVF procedure is at least as likely to fail as it is to succeed. Thus when it comes to outcome, luck is an undeniable factor. Notwithstanding, it is incumbent upon the treating physician to carefully consider and address the causes of IVF failure before proceeding to another attempt:
    1. Age: The chance of a woman under 35Y of age having a baby per embryo transfer is about 35-40%. From there it declines progressively to under 5% by the time she reaches her mid-forties. This is largely due to declining chromosomal integrity of the eggs with advancing age…”a wear and tear effect” on eggs that are in the ovaries from birth.
    2. Embryo Quality/”competency (capable of propagating a viable pregnancy)”. As stated, the woman’s age plays a big role in determining egg/embryo quality/”competency”. This having been said, aside from age the protocol used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) is the next most important factor. It is especially important when it comes to older women, and women with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) where it becomes essential to be aggressive, and to customize and individualize the ovarian stimulation protocol.
    We used to believe that the uterine environment is more beneficial to embryo development than is the incubator/petri dish and that accordingly, the earlier on in development that embryos are transferred to the uterus, the better. To achieve this goal, we used to select embryos for transfer based upon their day two or microscopic appearance (“grade”). But we have since learned that the further an embryo has advanced in its development, the more likely it is to be “competent” and that embryos failing to reach the expanded blastocyst stage within 5-6 days of being fertilized are almost invariably “incompetent” and are unworthy of being transferred. Moreover, the introduction into clinical practice about a decade ago, (by Levent Keskintepe PhD and myself) of Preimplantation Genetic Sampling (PGS), which assesses for the presence of all the embryos chromosomes (complete chromosomal karyotyping), provides another tool by which to select the most “competent” embryos for transfer. This methodology has selective benefit when it comes to older women, women with DOR, cases of unexplained repeated IVF failure and women who experience recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL).
    3. The number of the embryos transferred: Most patients believe that the more embryos transferred the greater the chance of success. To some extent this might be true, but if the problem lies with the use of a suboptimal COS protocol, transferring more embryos at a time won’t improve the chance of success. Nor will the transfer of a greater number of embryos solve an underlying embryo implantation dysfunction (anatomical molecular or immunologic).Moreover, the transfer of multiple embryos, should they implant, can and all too often does result in triplets or greater (high order multiples) which increases the incidence of maternal pregnancy-induced complications and of premature delivery with its serious risks to the newborn. It is for this reason that I rarely recommend the transfer of more than 2 embryos at a time and am moving in the direction of advising single embryo transfers …especially when it comes to transferring embryos derived through the fertilization of eggs from young women.
    4. Implantation Dysfunction (ID): Implantation dysfunction is a very common (often overlooked) cause of “unexplained” IVF failure. This is especially the case in young ovulating women who have normal ovarian reserve and have fertile partners. Failure to identify, typify, and address such issues is, in my opinion, an unfortunate and relatively common cause of repeated IVF failure in such women. Common sense dictates that if ultrasound guided embryo transfer is performed competently and yet repeated IVF attempts fail to propagate a viable pregnancy, implantation dysfunction must be seriously considered. Yet ID is probably the most overlooked factor. The most common causes of implantation dysfunction are:
    a. A“ thin uterine lining”
    b. A uterus with surface lesions in the cavity (polyps, fibroids, scar tissue)
    c. Immunologic implantation dysfunction (IID)
    d. Endocrine/molecular endometrial receptivity issues
    Certain causes of infertility are repetitive and thus cannot readily be reversed. Examples include advanced age of the woman; severe male infertility; immunologic infertility associated with alloimmune implantation dysfunction (especially if it is a “complete DQ alpha genetic match between partners plus uterine natural killer cell activation (NKa).
    I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.

    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements for Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Use of GnRH Antagonists (Ganirelix/Cetrotide/Orgalutron) in IVF-Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • Ovarian Stimulation in Women Who have Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR): Introducing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion protocol
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Blastocyst Embryo Transfers should be the Standard of Care in IVF
    • IVF: How Many Attempts should be considered before Stopping?
    • “Unexplained” Infertility: Often a matter of the Diagnosis Being Overlooked!
    • IVF Failure and Implantation Dysfunction:
    • The Role of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID): PART 1-Background
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID): PART 2- Making a Diagnosis
    • Immunologic Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID): PART 3-Treatment
    • Thyroid autoantibodies and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction: Importance of Meticulous Evaluation and Strategic Management 🙁 Case Report)
    • Intralipid and IVIG therapy: Understanding the Basis for its use in the Treatment of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Intralipid (IL) Administration in IVF: It’s Composition; how it Works; Administration; Side-effects; Reactions and Precautions
    • Natural Killer Cell Activation (NKa) and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction in IVF: The Controversy!
    • Endometrial Thickness, Uterine Pathology and Immunologic Factors
    • Vaginally Administered Viagra is Often a Highly Effective Treatment to Help Thicken a Thin Uterine Lining
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas:
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • How Many Embryos should be transferred: A Critical Decision in IVF?
    • The Role of Nutritional Supplements in Preparing for IVF

    If you are interested in seeking my advice or services, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com .

    *FYI
    The 4th edition of my newest book ,”In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoffrey Sher MD

  • marwa - July 8, 2017 reply

    i am 34 years old and i had several failed ivf none of them got me a bfp except for one chemical. i have endometriosis and high antithyroid anti bodies but cd56 is normal, i take prednisolon during the ivf cycle and dexamethason with lovenox. is intralipid recommended in my case and what other tests do you recommend for me? please help

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - July 8, 2017 reply

    CD56 levels (NK cells) are not relevant. It is NK cell activity as measured by the K-562 target cell test that can only be measured in a few Reproductive Immunology Reference laboratories in the U.S.A. I refer to Reprosource in Boston , MA. Both Endometriosis an Autoimmune hypothyroidism can cause this.

    Whenever a patient fails to achieve a viable pregnancy following embryo transfer (ET), the first question asked is why! Was it simply due to, bad luck?, How likely is the failure to recur in future attempts and what can be done differently, to avoid it happening next time?.
    It is an indisputable fact that any IVF procedure is at least as likely to fail as it is to succeed. Thus when it comes to outcome, luck is an undeniable factor. Notwithstanding, it is incumbent upon the treating physician to carefully consider and address the causes of IVF failure before proceeding to another attempt:
    1. Age: The chance of a woman under 35Y of age having a baby per embryo transfer is about 35-40%. From there it declines progressively to under 5% by the time she reaches her mid-forties. This is largely due to declining chromosomal integrity of the eggs with advancing age…”a wear and tear effect” on eggs that are in the ovaries from birth.
    2. Embryo Quality/”competency (capable of propagating a viable pregnancy)”. As stated, the woman’s age plays a big role in determining egg/embryo quality/”competency”. This having been said, aside from age the protocol used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) is the next most important factor. It is especially important when it comes to older women, and women with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) where it becomes essential to be aggressive, and to customize and individualize the ovarian stimulation protocol.
    We used to believe that the uterine environment is more beneficial to embryo development than is the incubator/petri dish and that accordingly, the earlier on in development that embryos are transferred to the uterus, the better. To achieve this goal, we used to select embryos for transfer based upon their day two or microscopic appearance (“grade”). But we have since learned that the further an embryo has advanced in its development, the more likely it is to be “competent” and that embryos failing to reach the expanded blastocyst stage within 5-6 days of being fertilized are almost invariably “incompetent” and are unworthy of being transferred. Moreover, the introduction into clinical practice about a decade ago, (by Levent Keskintepe PhD and myself) of Preimplantation Genetic Sampling (PGS), which assesses for the presence of all the embryos chromosomes (complete chromosomal karyotyping), provides another tool by which to select the most “competent” embryos for transfer. This methodology has selective benefit when it comes to older women, women with DOR, cases of unexplained repeated IVF failure and women who experience recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL).
    3. The number of the embryos transferred: Most patients believe that the more embryos transferred the greater the chance of success. To some extent this might be true, but if the problem lies with the use of a suboptimal COS protocol, transferring more embryos at a time won’t improve the chance of success. Nor will the transfer of a greater number of embryos solve an underlying embryo implantation dysfunction (anatomical molecular or immunologic).Moreover, the transfer of multiple embryos, should they implant, can and all too often does result in triplets or greater (high order multiples) which increases the incidence of maternal pregnancy-induced complications and of premature delivery with its serious risks to the newborn. It is for this reason that I rarely recommend the transfer of more than 2 embryos at a time and am moving in the direction of advising single embryo transfers …especially when it comes to transferring embryos derived through the fertilization of eggs from young women.
    4. Implantation Dysfunction (ID): Implantation dysfunction is a very common (often overlooked) cause of “unexplained” IVF failure. This is especially the case in young ovulating women who have normal ovarian reserve and have fertile partners. Failure to identify, typify, and address such issues is, in my opinion, an unfortunate and relatively common cause of repeated IVF failure in such women. Common sense dictates that if ultrasound guided embryo transfer is performed competently and yet repeated IVF attempts fail to propagate a viable pregnancy, implantation dysfunction must be seriously considered. Yet ID is probably the most overlooked factor. The most common causes of implantation dysfunction are:
    a. A“ thin uterine lining”
    b. A uterus with surface lesions in the cavity (polyps, fibroids, scar tissue)
    c. Immunologic implantation dysfunction (IID)
    d. Endocrine/molecular endometrial receptivity issues
    Certain causes of infertility are repetitive and thus cannot readily be reversed. Examples include advanced age of the woman; severe male infertility; immunologic infertility associated with alloimmune implantation dysfunction (especially if it is a “complete DQ alpha genetic match between partners plus uterine natural killer cell activation (NKa).
    I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.

    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Use of GnRH Antagonists (Ganirelix/Cetrotide/Orgalutron) in IVF-Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • Ovarian Stimulation in Women Who have Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR): Introducing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion protocol
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Blastocyst Embryo Transfers Should be the Standard of Care in IVF
    • IVF: How Many Attempts should be considered before Stopping?
    • “Unexplained” Infertility: Often a matter of the Diagnosis Being Overlooked!
    • IVF Failure and Implantation Dysfunction:
    • The Role of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 1-Background
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 2- Making a Diagnosis
    • Immunologic Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 3-Treatment
    • Thyroid autoantibodies and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction: Importance of Meticulous Evaluation and Strategic Management:(Case Report
    • Intralipid and IVIG therapy: Understanding the Basis for its use in the Treatment of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Intralipid (IL) Administration in IVF: It’s Composition; How it Works; Administration; Side-effects; Reactions and Precautions
    • Natural Killer Cell Activation (NKa) and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction in IVF: The Controversy!
    • Endometrial Thickness, Uterine Pathology and Immunologic Factors
    • Vaginally Administered Viagra is Often a Highly Effective Treatment to Help Thicken a Thin Uterine Lining
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas:
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • How Many Embryos should be transferred: A Critical Decision in IVF.
    • The Role of Nutritional Supplements in Preparing for IVF
    ANNOUNCEMENTS:
    1. About my Retirement
    After > 30 years in the field of Assisted Reproduction (AR), the time has finally come for me to contemplate retiring from full-time clinical medicine. If you are interested in my medical services prior to my retirement, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com. You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com.

    2. The 4th edition of my newest book ,
    “In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is now available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoffrey Sher MD

  • Chow - July 5, 2017 reply

    Hello Doctor,
    I am 35 and my Husband is 40. we just had our first IVF cycle with 2 good embryo and today morning was first BHCG test. my doctor just called and said that HCG level is 6 which is not expected but it is positive and he’ll decide after the next HCG (2nd) test about the next step. so, my question is will be there any positive hope that I can expect.

    I would really appreciate your valuable opinion.

    Regards,

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - July 5, 2017 reply

    Hi Chow.

    Yes, 6 is +ve but it is low and the prognosis is not great. Howeever, if the level keeps doubling every 48h, you should be OK. If not then this will be a chemical pregnancy.

    Good luck and G-d bless!

    Geoff Sher

    Chow - July 6, 2017 reply

    Thanks a lot doctor. will keep you posted and if require will make an appointment for web chat.
    regards,

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - July 6, 2017 reply

    Copy and good luck!

    Geoff Sher

    Chow - July 11, 2017

    Hello Doctor,
    Hope you are doing great. we are passing very crucial time. unfortunately luck didn’t favor this time. we met our doctor and he said he’ll go for a test called “hysteroscopy” before starting the next cycle. we are so confused …what should we do? you know, it is very stressful mentally and financially. Also he said that he’ll do genetic test this time. after doing all the stuff -still there is unknown of the success rate. please advise.

    I would really appreciate your time and suggestions.

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - July 11, 2017

    Whenever a patient fails to achieve a viable pregnancy following embryo transfer (ET), the first question asked is why! Was it simply due to, bad luck?, How likely is the failure to recur in future attempts and what can be done differently, to avoid it happening next time?.
    It is an indisputable fact that any IVF procedure is at least as likely to fail as it is to succeed. Thus when it comes to outcome, luck is an undeniable factor. Notwithstanding, it is incumbent upon the treating physician to carefully consider and address the causes of IVF failure before proceeding to another attempt:
    1. Age: The chance of a woman under 35Y of age having a baby per embryo transfer is about 35-40%. From there it declines progressively to under 5% by the time she reaches her mid-forties. This is largely due to declining chromosomal integrity of the eggs with advancing age…”a wear and tear effect” on eggs that are in the ovaries from birth.
    2. Embryo Quality/”competency (capable of propagating a viable pregnancy)”. As stated, the woman’s age plays a big role in determining egg/embryo quality/”competency”. This having been said, aside from age the protocol used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) is the next most important factor. It is especially important when it comes to older women, and women with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) where it becomes essential to be aggressive, and to customize and individualize the ovarian stimulation protocol.
    We used to believe that the uterine environment is more beneficial to embryo development than is the incubator/petri dish and that accordingly, the earlier on in development that embryos are transferred to the uterus, the better. To achieve this goal, we used to select embryos for transfer based upon their day two or microscopic appearance (“grade”). But we have since learned that the further an embryo has advanced in its development, the more likely it is to be “competent” and that embryos failing to reach the expanded blastocyst stage within 5-6 days of being fertilized are almost invariably “incompetent” and are unworthy of being transferred. Moreover, the introduction into clinical practice about a decade ago, (by Levent Keskintepe PhD and myself) of Preimplantation Genetic Sampling (PGS), which assesses for the presence of all the embryos chromosomes (complete chromosomal karyotyping), provides another tool by which to select the most “competent” embryos for transfer. This methodology has selective benefit when it comes to older women, women with DOR, cases of unexplained repeated IVF failure and women who experience recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL).
    3. The number of the embryos transferred: Most patients believe that the more embryos transferred the greater the chance of success. To some extent this might be true, but if the problem lies with the use of a suboptimal COS protocol, transferring more embryos at a time won’t improve the chance of success. Nor will the transfer of a greater number of embryos solve an underlying embryo implantation dysfunction (anatomical molecular or immunologic).Moreover, the transfer of multiple embryos, should they implant, can and all too often does result in triplets or greater (high order multiples) which increases the incidence of maternal pregnancy-induced complications and of premature delivery with its serious risks to the newborn. It is for this reason that I rarely recommend the transfer of more than 2 embryos at a time and am moving in the direction of advising single embryo transfers …especially when it comes to transferring embryos derived through the fertilization of eggs from young women.
    4. Implantation Dysfunction (ID): Implantation dysfunction is a very common (often overlooked) cause of “unexplained” IVF failure. This is especially the case in young ovulating women who have normal ovarian reserve and have fertile partners. Failure to identify, typify, and address such issues is, in my opinion, an unfortunate and relatively common cause of repeated IVF failure in such women. Common sense dictates that if ultrasound guided embryo transfer is performed competently and yet repeated IVF attempts fail to propagate a viable pregnancy, implantation dysfunction must be seriously considered. Yet ID is probably the most overlooked factor. The most common causes of implantation dysfunction are:
    a. A“ thin uterine lining”
    b. A uterus with surface lesions in the cavity (polyps, fibroids, scar tissue)
    c. Immunologic implantation dysfunction (IID)
    d. Endocrine/molecular endometrial receptivity issues
    Certain causes of infertility are repetitive and thus cannot readily be reversed. Examples include advanced age of the woman; severe male infertility; immunologic infertility associated with alloimmune implantation dysfunction (especially if it is a “complete DQ alpha genetic match between partners plus uterine natural killer cell activation (NKa).
    I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.

    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Use of GnRH Antagonists (Ganirelix/Cetrotide/Orgalutron) in IVF-Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • Ovarian Stimulation in Women Who have Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR): Introducing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion protocol
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Blastocyst Embryo Transfers Should be the Standard of Care in IVF
    • IVF: How Many Attempts should be considered before Stopping?
    • “Unexplained” Infertility: Often a matter of the Diagnosis Being Overlooked!
    • IVF Failure and Implantation Dysfunction:
    • The Role of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 1-Background
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 2- Making a Diagnosis
    • Immunologic Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 3-Treatment
    • Thyroid autoantibodies and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction: Importance of Meticulous Evaluation and Strategic Management:(Case Report
    • Intralipid and IVIG therapy: Understanding the Basis for its use in the Treatment of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Intralipid (IL) Administration in IVF: It’s Composition; How it Works; Administration; Side-effects; Reactions and Precautions
    • Natural Killer Cell Activation (NKa) and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction in IVF: The Controversy!
    • Endometrial Thickness, Uterine Pathology and Immunologic Factors
    • Vaginally Administered Viagra is Often a Highly Effective Treatment to Help Thicken a Thin Uterine Lining
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas:
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • How Many Embryos should be transferred: A Critical Decision in IVF.
    • The Role of Nutritional Supplements in Preparing for IVF
    ANNOUNCEMENTS:
    1. About my Retirement
    After > 30 years in the field of Assisted Reproduction (AR), the time has finally come for me to contemplate retiring from full-time clinical medicine. If you are interested in my medical services prior to my retirement, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com. You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com.

    2. The 4th edition of my newest book ,
    “In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is now available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoffrey Sher MD

  • Danielle Amodeo - June 13, 2017 reply

    Hello Dr. Sher,
    I just turned 36 my husband is 30. We have unexplained infertility and our on our send ivf cycle and just had our 6th failed transfer only send for this cycle. I have great egg quality. We still have four five day blatocysts frozen. The only time we got pregnant was our very first frozen transfer in our first IVF cycle which ended with a blighted ovum. No issues with me and my husband aside that he is type 1 diabetic with all thyroid issues that come with it. We are clearly sad we have another fail ed cycle. I know our doctor is scratching his head too. We basically have two more tries with our last embryos and that’s it for us. This had been over 5 year struggle. We could not afford pgs. The first doctor we went to for our first IVF cycle did hysterscopy and told me I had little bands of tissue in my uterus called sineki or something like that and she snipped them. She also said my uterus is heart shaped and she did something to try and fix it. After the blighted ovum she did a dnc on me. I question everything she did now. This doctor also thawed our last embryo after we canceled the cycle weeks before doing the prescreening or sign consents. Total nightmare. We are in better hands now but I really think there is an implantation problem maybe due to my uterus procedures. My current doctor found nothing on the saline. My lining was at 18 prior to transfer. He did a scratch test for our first frozen transfer and it still did not work. Can the saline show any scar tissue or would my doctor need to do surgery to see everything? I have a 16 year old son I had at 20. My mom had my sister at 42. I am,just at a loss. The embryos are near perfect each time. Was thinking of trying accupunctre before we try another frozen transfer. I always say I am not gonna cry after each dissapointing phone call but I do every time. Its hard to not have an answer. Anyway I appreciate any input you may be able to give me. The white bands of tissue I had was found while my gyn did exploratory surgery to rule out endometriosis. She said I had a small amount but nothing that would get in the way. She referred me to the first fertility doctor to address the white bands of scar tissue because this was not her expertise. It was not Ashermans just this sineki she called it. I still have now idea what it could have been from. Thank you in advance

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - June 13, 2017 reply

    Hi Danielle,

    Yes, it certainly sounds like an implantation issue. Frankly, I do not believe that a partial uterine septum causes infertility or that surgery to correct this helps. In fact, in my opinion it can cause additional scarring to the detriment of implantation in some cases. I also vbelieve endometrial scratch to be a meritless procedure and do not do it.

    Yours could be a lining issue due to previous endometritis with damage to the basal endometrium or a secondary immunologic issue.

    Whenever a patient fails to achieve a viable pregnancy following embryo transfer (ET), the first question asked is why! Was it simply due to, bad luck?, How likely is the failure to recur in future attempts and what can be done differently, to avoid it happening next time?.
    It is an indisputable fact that any IVF procedure is at least as likely to fail as it is to succeed. Thus when it comes to outcome, luck is an undeniable factor. Notwithstanding, it is incumbent upon the treating physician to carefully consider and address the causes of IVF failure before proceeding to another attempt:
    1. Age: The chance of a woman under 35Y of age having a baby per embryo transfer is about 35-40%. From there it declines progressively to under 5% by the time she reaches her mid-forties. This is largely due to declining chromosomal integrity of the eggs with advancing age…”a wear and tear effect” on eggs that are in the ovaries from birth.
    2. Embryo Quality/”competency (capable of propagating a viable pregnancy)”. As stated, the woman’s age plays a big role in determining egg/embryo quality/”competency”. This having been said, aside from age the protocol used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) is the next most important factor. It is especially important when it comes to older women, and women with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) where it becomes essential to be aggressive, and to customize and individualize the ovarian stimulation protocol.
    We used to believe that the uterine environment is more beneficial to embryo development than is the incubator/petri dish and that accordingly, the earlier on in development that embryos are transferred to the uterus, the better. To achieve this goal, we used to select embryos for transfer based upon their day two or microscopic appearance (“grade”). But we have since learned that the further an embryo has advanced in its development, the more likely it is to be “competent” and that embryos failing to reach the expanded blastocyst stage within 5-6 days of being fertilized are almost invariably “incompetent” and are unworthy of being transferred. Moreover, the introduction into clinical practice about a decade ago, (by Levent Keskintepe PhD and myself) of Preimplantation Genetic Sampling (PGS), which assesses for the presence of all the embryos chromosomes (complete chromosomal karyotyping), provides another tool by which to select the most “competent” embryos for transfer. This methodology has selective benefit when it comes to older women, women with DOR, cases of unexplained repeated IVF failure and women who experience recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL).
    3. The number of the embryos transferred: Most patients believe that the more embryos transferred the greater the chance of success. To some extent this might be true, but if the problem lies with the use of a suboptimal COS protocol, transferring more embryos at a time won’t improve the chance of success. Nor will the transfer of a greater number of embryos solve an underlying embryo implantation dysfunction (anatomical molecular or immunologic).Moreover, the transfer of multiple embryos, should they implant, can and all too often does result in triplets or greater (high order multiples) which increases the incidence of maternal pregnancy-induced complications and of premature delivery with its serious risks to the newborn. It is for this reason that I rarely recommend the transfer of more than 2 embryos at a time and am moving in the direction of advising single embryo transfers …especially when it comes to transferring embryos derived through the fertilization of eggs from young women.
    4. Implantation Dysfunction (ID): Implantation dysfunction is a very common (often overlooked) cause of “unexplained” IVF failure. This is especially the case in young ovulating women who have normal ovarian reserve and have fertile partners. Failure to identify, typify, and address such issues is, in my opinion, an unfortunate and relatively common cause of repeated IVF failure in such women. Common sense dictates that if ultrasound guided embryo transfer is performed competently and yet repeated IVF attempts fail to propagate a viable pregnancy, implantation dysfunction must be seriously considered. Yet ID is probably the most overlooked factor. The most common causes of implantation dysfunction are:
    a. A“ thin uterine lining”
    b. A uterus with surface lesions in the cavity (polyps, fibroids, scar tissue)
    c. Immunologic implantation dysfunction (IID)
    d. Endocrine/molecular endometrial receptivity issues
    Certain causes of infertility are repetitive and thus cannot readily be reversed. Examples include advanced age of the woman; severe male infertility; immunologic infertility associated with alloimmune implantation dysfunction (especially if it is a “complete DQ alpha genetic match between partners plus uterine natural killer cell activation (NKa).
    I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.

    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Use of GnRH Antagonists (Ganirelix/Cetrotide/Orgalutron) in IVF-Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • Ovarian Stimulation in Women Who have Diminished Ovarian Reserve (DOR): Introducing the Agonist/Antagonist Conversion protocol
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Blastocyst Embryo Transfers Should be the Standard of Care in IVF
    • IVF: How Many Attempts should be considered before Stopping?
    • “Unexplained” Infertility: Often a matter of the Diagnosis Being Overlooked!
    • IVF Failure and Implantation Dysfunction:
    • The Role of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 1-Background
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 2- Making a Diagnosis
    • Immunologic Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 3-Treatment
    • Thyroid autoantibodies and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction: Importance of Meticulous Evaluation and Strategic Management:(Case Report
    • Intralipid and IVIG therapy: Understanding the Basis for its use in the Treatment of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Intralipid (IL) Administration in IVF: It’s Composition; How it Works; Administration; Side-effects; Reactions and Precautions
    • Natural Killer Cell Activation (NKa) and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction in IVF: The Controversy!
    • Endometrial Thickness, Uterine Pathology and Immunologic Factors
    • Vaginally Administered Viagra is Often a Highly Effective Treatment to Help Thicken a Thin Uterine Lining
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas:
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • How Many Embryos should be transferred: A Critical Decision in IVF.
    • The Role of Nutritional Supplements in Preparing for IVF

    ANNOUNCEMENTS:
    1. About my Retirement by mid-2018:
    After > 30 years in the field of Assisted Reproduction (AR), the time is approaching for my retirement. If you are interested in my medical services prior to my retirement, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com. You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com.
    If you are interested in my medical services prior to my retirement, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com. You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com.

    2. The 4th edition of my newest book ,
    “In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is now available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoffrey Sher MD

  • Chioma - June 11, 2017 reply

    Hi,
    I live in the UK with my husband and got site of your blog by searching for ‘reasons for ivf failure’.
    I was recommended ivf cos there was no clear indication of why I shouldn’t be pregnant. I was a virgin before marriage and then after the first intercourse started having very heavy and painful bleeding (before this my periods were not even painful), After trying for a year with no results, the doctors decided to look into the fibroid issue esp as I had some within the cavity. One of the doctors decided against surgery but after I was referred for IVF, they decided to perform surgery which was done and the heavy bleeding stopped. For the egg retrieval process, everything went on smoothly and they got about 18 eggs (I am now 42-started this journey when I was 37). When it was time for transfer they noticed I had fluid in my womb and decided to do a hysteroscopy and biospy. My left tube was removed as it was damaged and the doctor said I had no scarring from the first surgery. This fluid comes and goes.I was put on the injections/progynova/cyclogest and evorel, My linning was so thin it was going up and down and eventually came up to 7mm and the my concern was that the fluid was still there but they decided to go ahead and transfer. On the day of the transfer, the fluid was gone and it was a normal transfer. During the 2ww period, I had no symptoms until day 10 after transfer, I felt like I was coming down with something and I was cold and at that moment I kinda knew that was the day it went wrong for me. This is my first cycle and I need your help as to what questions I can ask or things that might have gone wrong..
    We do not have the funds for another cycle do not sure how we can eve move forward. Thanks

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - June 11, 2017 reply

    1. Your uterine lining, in my opinion needs to measure at least 8mm (preferably >9mm) on the day of hCG trigger or initiation of progesterone therapy (with FET). Less than 8mm thick. should in my opinion PRECLUDE going forward with ET because: a) pregnancy is highly unlikely; b) should pregnancy occur it is highly likely to result in early loss c) less frequently later miscarriage, d) sometimes placental insufficiency with intrauterine growth retardation and/or stillbirth. Thus, until and unless this can be reversed, you will in my opinion have very little chance of success. This will require defining the cause and addressing it. This might require repeat hysteroscopic surgery followed by proactive estrogen therapy with vaginal Viagra and oral antiprostaglandin therapy. If all efforts fail, then gestational surrogacy.

    2. Given your age and the negative impact this ineviably has on egg/embryo quality the most important issue here is to propagate and bank competent (PGS-normal) blastocysts for cryopreservation…before it is too late.

    3.In my opinion, the protocol used for ovarian stimulation, against the backdrop of age, and ovarian reserve are the drivers of egg quality and egg quality is the most important factor affecting embryo “competency”.
    Older women as well as those who (regardless of age) have diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) tend to produce fewer and less “competent” eggs, the main reason for reduced IVF success in such cases. The compromised outcome is largely due to the fact that such women tend to have increased LH biological activity which often results in excessive LH-induced ovarian testosterone production which in turn can have a deleterious effect on egg/embryo “competency”.
    Certain ovarian stimulation regimes either promote excessive LH production (e.g. short agonist/Lupron- “flare” protocols, clomiphene and Letrozole), augment LH/hCG delivered through additional administration (e.g. high dosage menotropins such as Menopur), or fail to protect against body’s own/self-produced LH (e.g. late antagonist protocols where drugs such as Ganirelix/Cetrotide/Orgalutron that are first administered 6-7 days after ovarian stimulation has commenced). I try to avoid using such protocols/regimes (especially) in older women and those with DOR, favoring instead the use of a modified, long pituitary down-regulation protocol (the agonist/antagonist conversion protocol-A/ACP) augmented by adding supplementary human growth hormone (HGH). I further recommend Staggered IVF with embryo banking of PGS (next generation gene sequencing/NGS)-normal blastocysts in such cases. This type of approach will in my opinion, optimize the chance of a viable pregnancy per embryo transfer procedure and provide an opportunity to capitalize on whatever residual ovarian reserve and egg quality still exists, allowing the chance to “make hay while the sun still shines”.

    4. I strongly recommend that you visit http://www.DrGeoffreySherIVF.com. Then go to my Blog and access the “search bar”. Type in the titles of any/all of the articles listed below, one by one. “Click” and you will immediately be taken to those you select. Please also take the time to post any questions or comments with the full expectation that I will (as always) respond promptly.
    • The IVF Journey: The importance of “Planning the Trip” Before Taking the Ride”
    • Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) for IVF: Selecting the ideal protocol
    • IVF: Factors Affecting Egg/Embryo “competency” during Controlled Ovarian Stimulation(COS)
    • The Fundamental Requirements For Achieving Optimal IVF Success
    • Use of GnRH Antagonists (Ganirelix/Cetrotide/Orgalutron) in IVF-Ovarian Stimulation Protocols.
    • Anti Mullerian Hormone (AMH) Measurement to Assess Ovarian Reserve and Design the Optimal Protocol for Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS) in IVF.
    • Human Growth Hormone Administration in IVF: Does it Enhances Egg/Embryo Quality and Outcome?
    • The BCP: Does Launching a Cycle of Controlled Ovarian Stimulation (COS). Coming off the BCP Compromise Response?
    • Blastocyst Embryo Transfers Should be the Standard of Care in IVF
    • Why did my IVF Fail
    • Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET): A Rational Approach to Hormonal Preparation and How new Methodology is Impacting IVF.
    • Embryo Banking/Stockpiling: Slows the “Biological Clock” and offers a Selective Alternative to IVF-Egg Donation
    • Preimplantation Genetic Testing (PGS) in IVF: It should be Used Selectively and NOT be Routine.
    • IVF: Selecting the Best Quality Embryos to Transfer
    • Preimplantation Genetic Sampling (PGS) Using: Next Generation Gene Sequencing (NGS): Method of Choice.
    • PGS in IVF: Are Some Chromosomally abnormal Embryos Capable of Resulting in Normal Babies and Being Wrongly Discarded?
    • PGS and Assessment of Egg/Embryo “competency”: How Method, Timing and Methodology Could Affect Reliability
    • IVF Failure and Implantation Dysfunction:
    • The Role of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 1-Background
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 2- Making a Diagnosis
    • Immunologic Dysfunction (IID) & Infertility (IID):PART 3-Treatment
    • Thyroid autoantibodies and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction: Importance of Meticulous Evaluation and Strategic Management:(Case Report
    • Intralipid and IVIG therapy: Understanding the Basis for its use in the Treatment of Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction (IID)
    • Intralipid (IL) Administration in IVF: It’s Composition; How it Works; Administration; Side-effects; Reactions and Precautions
    • Natural Killer Cell Activation (NKa) and Immunologic Implantation Dysfunction in IVF: The Controversy!
    • Endometrial Thickness, Uterine Pathology and Immunologic Factors
    • Vaginally Administered Viagra is Often a Highly Effective Treatment to Help Thicken a Thin Uterine Lining
    • Treating Out-of-State and Out-of-Country Patients at Sher-IVF in Las Vegas
    • Should IVF Treatment Cycles be provided uninterrupted or be Conducted in 7-12 Pre-scheduled “Batches” per Year
    • A personalized, stepwise approach to IVF
    • Implications of “Empty Follicle Syndrome and “Premature Luteinization”
    • Premature Luteinization (“the premature LH surge): Why it happens and how it can be prevented.
    • IVF-Gestational Surrogacy: An Overview

    ANNOUNCEMENTS:
    1. About my Retirement by mid-2018:
    After > 30 years in the field of Assisted Reproduction (AR), the time is approaching for my retirement. If you are interested in my medical services prior to my retirement, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com. You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com.
    If you are interested in my medical services prior to my retirement, I urge you to contact my concierge, Julie Dahan ASAP to set up a Skype or an in-person consultation with me. You can also contact Julie by phone or via email at 702-533-2691/ Julied@sherivf.com. You can also apply online at http://www.SherIVF.com.

    2. The 4th edition of my newest book ,
    “In Vitro Fertilization, the ART of Making Babies” is now available as a down-load through http://www.Amazon.com or from most bookstores and public libraries.

    Geoffrey Sher MD

  • Tara - June 2, 2017 reply

    Hello,
    I have a question regarding the PGS of embryos. Am I right is assuming this cannot be done with already frozen 5 day blastocysts?
    I have had 2 blastocyst transfers both of which have implanted but miscarried. The first was successful in that we had a viable pregnancy at 6 week scan but miscarried after 8 weeks when hcg showed a decline. The second (very recently) resulted in a chemical pregnancy with very low levels of hcg at the initial blood test. In both cases the endo lining was considered good triple layer >9mm I believe. I have not been thoroughly tested for immulogic problems. My TSh at the last test was 1.6 mIU/l and free thyroxine was 14.4 pmol/l.
    I am nervous about the next attempt. we have two more frozen 5 day blastocysts. I cannot remember the exact grading right now but I can find out. There may be chromosomal abnormalities but as I said at the start I presume this can’t be test after the 5 day blastocyst has been frozen. The reason for doing the IVF was due to fallopian tube issues both of which were removed.
    My clinic doctors are going to have a sit down to run through everything again and see what can be done differently or not. I appreciate this is not a full history but any feedback in general is greatly received. Happy to proved more info if needed. With thanks. Tara

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher

    Dr. Geoffrey Sher - June 2, 2017 reply

    Pregnancies can and do occur after transferring embryos that were thawed for PGS testing and then refrozen to await repeat thawing (once the results are in) before transferring them. However, in my opinion, this approach is traumatic and can reduce the viability of such embryos, reducing the chance of success. Since testing does NOT improve embryo quality (it merely improves selection of euploid embryos for transfer), I see no point in putting your 2 vitrified embryos through this. Why not transfer the two without testing.

    Geoff Sher

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